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    Know Your Allergy Triggers

    6. Latex

    You may have a mild reaction, like itchy red skin, from latex in gloves, condoms, or other things. If it’s a true latex allergy, you could also have symptoms like:

    • Teary, irritated eyes
    • Runny nose
    • Sneezing
    • Cough
    • Wheezing

    It’s less common, but some people can have anaphylaxis from latex.

    To treat this allergy, you may need to take antihistamines. Your doctor may also recommend you keep an epinephrine auto injector (Auvi-Q or EpiPen) with you at all times in case of emergency.

    Do this:

    • Avoid anything that has latex in it.
    • Wear a bracelet that lets people know you have a latex allergy.
    • If you have an anaphylactic reaction, immediately use an epinephrine auto-injector and call 911.

    7. Food

    Some foods may bother you. But that doesn’t necessarily mean you have an allergy.

    When you have an allergic reaction to food, it usually happens within minutes after you eat the problem food. These allergies can be mild or severe. For instance, some children must avoid peanuts in order to prevent a life-threatening anaphylactic reaction.

    Milk, fish and shellfish, nuts, soybeans, wheat, and eggs are among the most common foods that cause allergies. Your doctor can help you pinpoint exactly what your triggers are so you can avoid them.

    Symptoms can include:

    • Wheezing or trouble breathing
    • Hives
    • Vomiting
    • Diarrhea
    • Swelling around the mouth

    Do this:

    • Avoid the foods that your body doesn’t handle well.
    • If you think you have an allergy, ask your doctor to check it.
    • If you have a food allergy, you should carry an epinephrine auto-injector that you can use in case of emergency. You should also call 911 immediately if you have symptoms of anaphylaxis.

     

    8. Drugs

    Some people are allergic to certain medicines, such as penicillin or aspirin.

    Symptoms can range from a mild reaction like a skin rash a few days after you start a drug to a severe and immediate reaction. They can be concerning because they can lead to anaphylaxis. Serious symptoms include:

    • Hives
    • Itchy eyes & skin
    • Flushing
    • Belly pain, nausea, vomiting
    • Swelling in the mouth, throat, hands, and feet
    • Feeling light headed or passing out

    For serious reactions, including anaphylaxis, you’ll need to call 911, and you may be hospitalized. For milder symptoms, your doctor may give you an antihistamine or steroids.

    Do this:

    • For serious reactions, including anaphylaxis, you’ll need to call 911 and you may be hospitalized. For milder symptoms, your doctor may give you an antihistamine or steroids.
    • If you know you have a drug allergy or think you might, talk with your doctor. The doctor may refer you for allergy testing.

     

    WebMD Medical Reference

    Reviewed by Sabrina Felson, MD on June 13, 2017
    1 | 2 | 3

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