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Antifibrinolytic Agents for Hemophilia

Examples

Generic NameBrand Name
aminocaproic acidAmicar
tranexamic acidCyklokapron

How It Works

Antifibrinolytic agents may be used in specific situations or in combination with clotting factor replacement to treat hemophilia. Antifibrinolytic agents prevent the breakdown of blood clots by neutralizing chemicals in the blood and mucous membranes of the mouth, nose, and urinary tract that break down clots.

Why It Is Used

Antifibrinolytic agents are used to treat nosebleeds (epistaxis) and to help prevent bleeding in the mouth with dental surgery.

Antifibrinolytic medicines may be given instead of or along with clotting factors in certain situations. For example, antifibrinolytic agents may be used to:

  • Help prevent bleeding in the mouth, nose, or urinary tract only.
  • Help prevent bleeding after dental surgery instead of clotting factor replacement.

How Well It Works

Antifibrinolytic agents effectively prevent or stop bleeding of the mouth.1

Side Effects

All medicines have side effects. But many people don't feel the side effects, or they are able to deal with them. Ask your pharmacist about the side effects of each medicine you take. Side effects are also listed in the information that comes with your medicine.

Here are some important things to think about:

  • Usually the benefits of the medicine are more important than any minor side effects.
  • Side effects may go away after you take the medicine for a while.
  • If side effects still bother you and you wonder if you should keep taking the medicine, call your doctor. He or she may be able to lower your dose or change your medicine. Do not suddenly quit taking your medicine unless your doctor tells you to.

Call 911 or other emergency services right away if you have:

  • Trouble breathing.
  • Swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor if you have:

  • Hives.

Call your doctor right away if you suddenly have symptoms of a blood clot, such as:

  • Severe headache.
  • Pain in the chest, groin, or calves.
  • Shortness of breath.
  • Vision changes.
  • Feeling weak or numb in your arms or legs.

Side effects of this medicine are not common but may include:

  • Diarrhea.
  • Nausea or vomiting.

See Drug Reference for a full list of side effects. (Drug Reference is not available in all systems.)

What To Think About

Antifibrinolytic medicine can be taken in pill or liquid form. Or it can be injected.

Taking medicine

Medicine is one of the many tools your doctor has to treat a health problem. Taking medicine as your doctor suggests will improve your health and may prevent future problems. If you don't take your medicines properly, you may be putting your health (and perhaps your life) at risk.

There are many reasons why people have trouble taking their medicine. But in most cases, there is something you can do. For suggestions on how to work around common problems, see the topic Taking Medicines as Prescribed.

Advice for women

If you are pregnant, breast-feeding, or trying to get pregnant, do not use any medicines unless your doctor tells you to. Some medicines can harm your baby. This includes prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, herbs, and supplements. And make sure that all your doctors know that you are pregnant, breast-feeding, or planning to get pregnant.

Checkups

Follow-up care is a key part of your treatment and safety. Be sure to make and go to all appointments, and call your doctor if you are having problems. It's also a good idea to know your test results and keep a list of the medicines you take.

Complete the new medication information form (PDF)(What is a PDF document?) to help you understand this medication.

Citations

  1. Hillman RS, et al. (2011). Hemophilia and other intrinsic pathway defects. In RS Hillman et al., eds., Hematology in Clinical Practice, 5th ed., pp. 398–410. New York: McGraw-Hill.

ByHealthwise Staff
Primary Medical ReviewerE. Gregory Thompson, MD - Internal Medicine
Specialist Medical ReviewerBrian Leber, MDCM, FRCPC - Hematology
Current as ofMarch 12, 2014

WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: March 12, 2014
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.

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