Skip to content

Bunions

Font Size

Surgery

Bunion surgery generally involves making an incision in the top or side of the big toe joint area and removing or realigning soft tissue and bone. The goals of surgery for bunions are to:

  • Relieve pain and restore normal alignment to the toe joint.
  • Restore, as much as possible, normal weight-bearing distribution to the foot.
  • Allow you to return to normal activities.

You may have to consider surgery if your bunion results in persistent, severe pain that limits your daily activities or if you have a severe foot deformity.

Bunions: Should I Have Surgery?

Surgery is not recommended if you:

  • Have not tried nonsurgical treatment.
  • Have other health problems that make surgery dangerous. If you have diabetes, neuromuscular disorders, or circulatory problems that limit blood flow to your feet, discuss the risks of surgery with your doctor. Such conditions increase the chance of complications after surgery.
  • Have unrealistic expectations about the results of surgery (such as being able to wear any kind of shoe).

Athletes, children, and people with certain health problems are generally advised to take a conservative, nonsurgical approach when considering bunion treatment.

What to think about

Joint replacement surgery is not often done to repair a bunion. If your doctor recommends joint replacement, get a second opinion.

Some issues to consider when deciding about bunion surgery:

  • The type of surgery used depends not only on how severe the bunion is but also on your surgeon's experience. Look for a surgeon who does many different types of bunion surgery on a regular basis. Each bunion is different, and surgery needs to be tailored to each case. Research does not show which type of surgery is best.
  • Bunions may return after surgery, especially if you continue to wear narrow or high-heeled shoes.
  • Your expectations may influence your satisfaction with the surgery. For example, although surgery may improve your foot's appearance, those who make appearance their primary reason for surgery are generally disappointed in the results. Discuss your expectations with your doctor.
  • Surgery may reduce the flexibility of the big toe joint, which may be a concern if you are active and need a full range of motion in the big toe.
  • You will have to stay off your foot for a while after surgery.
1

WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: August 05, 2013
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
Next Article:

Hot Topics

WebMD Video: Now Playing

Click here to wach video: Dirty Truth About Hand Washing

Which sex is the worst about washing up? Why is it so important? We’ve got the dirty truth on how and when to wash your hands.

Click here to watch video: Dirty Truth About Hand Washing

Popular Slideshows & Tools on WebMD

disciplining a boy
Types, symptoms, causes.
psoriasis
What it looks like.
fruit drinks
Eat these to think better.
No gym workout
Moves to help control blood sugar.
acupuncture needle on shoulder
10 tips to look and feel good.
Close up of eye
12 reasons you're distracted.
Epinephrine Injection using Auto-Injector Syringe
Life-threatening triggers.
woman biting a big ice cube
Habits that wreck your teeth.
embarrassed woman
Do you feel guilty after eating?
pacemaker next to xray
Treatment options.
caregiver with parent
10 tips for daily life.
birth control pills
Which kind is right for you?

Women's Health Newsletter

Find out what women really need.