Skip to content

Information and Resources

Common Problems Patients Face in the Hospital

Understand your hospital risks and ask these vital questions -- to keep those risks in check.
Font Size
A
A
A

Hospital Risk No. 4: Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) continued...

Surgery significantly increases your risks of DVT for several reasons. If you're immobile in bed, your circulation gets worse. That makes the blood more likely to pool and clot in your legs. Also the blood vessels in your legs can become very "relaxed" during the anesthesia used for surgery and the blood can slow down its movement enough to form a clot, especially if the vessel has had prior damage (for example, by way of a previous history of a broken leg) . The trauma of surgery itself also increases the blood's clotting tendency.

Without preventative treatment, the odds of getting DVT after a prolonged major surgery are 25%. For some surgeries, like joint replacement, the odds of DVT are more than 50%.

Fortunately, careful use of blood thinners can slash the risk of DVT without increasing your risk of bleeding. But as effective and safe as this preventative treatment is, studies have shown that these precautions are often ignored. So you should always ask about it.

"Never be afraid to ask about the risk of DVT after your specific surgery," says Angood. "Ask whether you will be getting preventative treatment and for how long."

Another method of DVT prevention is something you can do on your own. "The sooner you can start moving around, the lower your risk of DVT," Clancy says. Stretching and -- when your doctor gives you the OK, getting up and walking -- will get your circulation back to normal.

Hospital Risk No. 5: Bleeding After Surgery

While clotting is a risk for DVT, uncontrolled bleeding after surgery causes problems of its own. However, there's good news. "Bleeding after surgery is not as much of a problem as it once was," Griffin says, thanks to improved surgical techniques. Still, you should make an effort to lower the risks further.

That starts with making certain that your doctor knows every medication -- vitamins, supplements, or homeopathic medication -- that you use. Common medicines -- like the painkillers aspirin and ibuprofen -- can thin your blood, increasing the risk of bleeding. Your doctor will probably tell you to stop taking any medicine that might have this effect a week or two before surgery, Clancy says.

Hot Topics

WebMD Video: Now Playing

Click here to wach video: Dirty Truth About Hand Washing

Which sex is the worst about washing up? Why is it so important? We’ve got the dirty truth on how and when to wash your hands.

Click here to watch video: Dirty Truth About Hand Washing

Popular Slideshows & Tools on WebMD

feet
Solutions for 19 types.
MS Overview
Recognizing symptoms.
pregnancy test and calendar
Helping you get pregnant.
build a better butt
How to build a better butt.
lone star tick
How to identify that bite.
woman standing behind curtains
How it affects you.
brain scan with soda
Tips to avoid complications.
row of colored highlighter pens
Tips for living better.
psoriasis
How to keep flares at bay.
woman dreaming
What Do Your Dreams Say About You?
spinal compression fracture
Treatment options.

Pollen counts, treatment tips, and more.

It's nothing to sneeze at.

Loading ...

Sending your email...

This feature is temporarily unavailable. Please try again later.

Thanks!

Now check your email account on your mobile phone to download your new app.

Women's Health Newsletter

Find out what women really need.