Skip to content

Information and Resources

Bush Health Budget: FDA Gets More, CDC Gets Less.

Bush Health Budget
Font Size
A
A
A

WebMD Feature

April 9, 2001 (Washington) -- Taking a key early step in the annual Washington budget negotiations dance, the administration Monday officially delivered to Congress hundreds of pages of documents containing its proposals for national spending for 2002.

In late February, Bush released initial budget numbers, but this submission fills in the details of his plan. Overall, President Bush is asking for $55.5 billion for discretionary programs under the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), a 5.1% increase over last year.

Recommended Related to Health Ins & Medicare

When Disability Strikes Unexpectedly

Becoming disabled even for a short time can turn your life upside down. Extended disability can sometimes create financial problems and emotional stress. Knowing what to do if you become disabled can help lessen the stress and financial burden of disability.

Read the When Disability Strikes Unexpectedly article > >

Nearly all of the health spending increase goes to the National Institutes of Health, which is getting a 13.5%, or $2.8 billion, boost for its biomedical research activities. Another big winner is the FDA, which is netting a nearly 10% boost, with large increases in food safety initiatives, including a mad cow disease prevention effort and tougher rules for imported food and healthcare products.

At the same time, the budget cuts funds by 3% at the CDC, as well as money for various public health programs, including a hemophilia relief program, "community access" grants to coordinate the delivery of safety-net healthcare, and other initiatives.

"There's some grumbling," HHS Secretary Tommy Thompson acknowledged, regarding those agencies that received cuts. But he contended that many of the cutbacks were "one-time" set-aside projects done for specific members of Congress.

Thompson said, "The American people don't expect annual budgets to be growing by double digits, for their family budgets certainly don't grow at that pace."

The proposal would also slash spending on grants for the training of doctors. And to speed conversion to electronic billing, the plan would also charge doctors and other providers a $1.50 fee for submitting paper-based reimbursement claims to Medicare.

But Thompson touted a $123 million increase in spending on safety-net community health centers and a 7.2% increase for government efforts in AIDS/HIV research, treatment, and prevention. Thompson repeatedly spoke of the hope of finding an AIDS vaccine.

The Bush budget also increases funding for women's health programs.

The health budget has traditionally been released at HHS headquarters near Capitol Hill, but Thompson unveiled the blueprint Monday at an inner-city youth center.

Hot Topics

WebMD Video: Now Playing

Click here to wach video: Dirty Truth About Hand Washing

Which sex is the worst about washing up? Why is it so important? We’ve got the dirty truth on how and when to wash your hands.

Click here to watch video: Dirty Truth About Hand Washing

Popular Slideshows & Tools on WebMD

feet
Solutions for 19 types.
MS Overview
Recognizing symptoms.
pregnancy test and calendar
Helping you get pregnant.
man rubbing painful knee
A visual guide.
lone star tick
How to identify that bite.
woman standing behind curtains
How it affects you.
brain scan with soda
Tips to avoid complications.
row of colored highlighter pens
Tips for living better.
human lungs
Symptoms, causes, treatments.
woman dreaming
What Do Your Dreams Say About You?
two male hands
Test your knowledge.

Pollen counts, treatment tips, and more.

It's nothing to sneeze at.

Loading ...

Sending your email...

This feature is temporarily unavailable. Please try again later.

Thanks!

Now check your email account on your mobile phone to download your new app.

Women's Health Newsletter

Find out what women really need.