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Living With a Severe Digestive Disorder

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By Daphne Butas
WebMD Feature

Having a severe digestive disorder doesn't just affect what your child eats. It affects many parts of her daily life and those of her siblings as well. With care and planning, you can help daily life go smoother for everyone in your family.

School Life

Digestive disorder symptoms -- diarrhea, constipation, gas, stomach pain -- can be especially awkward for a child. At school, your child may:

  • Get teased about the disorder
  • Be self-conscious about restroom use
  • Feel peer pressure about his food choices
  • Feel he can't rely on his body to be "normal"
  • Find it hard to focus and keep up sometimes

An individualized education program (IEP) can give your child special accommodations at school. An IEP might include things like letting him go to the bathroom without having to ask, using the nurse's bathroom, or getting extra time on tests. Ask the school staff about getting one. 

If his condition is severe, a break from regular school may be a good idea. “There are many options in today's world,” says Sue Eull, RN, who works with families and children that have severe digestive disorders. Online classes, home schooling, and tutoring are some options. 

Explore what's out there to see which is best for your child. For example, Eull says one teenager she worked with would have missed many school days if she went to her local school. Her parents chose to have a tutor teach her instead. That gave their daughter the energy to join her local volleyball club. The time she spent time with other teens was good for her health and confidence.

Diet and Nutrition

“Losing weight is a common side effect of having a severe digestive disorder," says Frank J. Sileo, PhD. There's no specific diet for most digestive disorders. Aim for a healthy, well-balanced diet and avoid foods that cause your child's symptoms to flare. 

To keep your child's diet healthy:

  • Talk to her doctor before removing any foods.
  • Keep a food journal. It can help you pin down problem foods and decide if your child is getting enough nutrients.
  • Talk with a dietitian about ways to help your child eat well.

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