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    My Kid Is Drug-Free

    Mandatory drug tests.

    WebMD Feature

    Aug. 18 -- Like any other junior high student in the dusty Texas farming community of Lockney, Brady Tannahill has studied the Bill of Rights in school. But unlike most, the 12-year-old is going to court to defend it.

    Last December, the Lockney Independent School District announced a new strategy in its war against drugs in the schools: Starting in February 2000, every junior and senior high school student would have to submit to drug testing.

    The district sent home a release form for all parents to sign, authorizing school officials to test their children. But when Brady's father, Larry, received it, he did something unexpected: He just said no.

    "I believe in my son," says Tannahill. "My wife and I have no reason to suspect he takes drugs. The school system has no reason to suspect he takes drugs. I say, given those facts, that there is no reason for him to be tested for drugs."

    Brady agrees. He doesn't think his school has a problem with drugs and doesn't know any kids in his class that take them. "I just don't think it's right that I have to be tested," he says.

    The district responded to the Tannahills' refusal by threatening to suspend Brady from school. Then, in what's shaping up as the civics lesson of a lifetime, Brady and his father, with the help of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), filed suit against the district in federal court in Lubbock, claiming the mandatory drug testing policy violates Brady's Fourth Amendment rights.

    The high-stakes legal battle that's emerging could affect students' rights not only in tiny Lockney, but all across the country. It has turned a father and son into national news makers. But it's also made them hometown pariahs, spurned by many in the community.

    In March, about 700 people -- nearly a third of the town's population -- turned out for a school board meeting where the elder Tannahill was to speak against the district's plan. Many wore T-shirts that read, "The LISD Drug Policy -- We Appreciate It."

    During the meeting the audience erupted in loud ovations for adult and student speakers supporting the policy. Tannahill spoke to dead silence and got no applause or support.

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