Skip to content
    Font Size
    A
    A
    A

    Health Care Agents: Appointing One and Being One

    When would I be asked to make decisions?

    Normally the agent becomes the decision maker after the attending physician determines that the patient either temporarily or permanently lacks the ability to make health care decisions. Many states also require that a second physician confirm the patient's incapacity if the decision involves withholding or withdrawing life support treatments.

    What do I need to know to make decisions?

    You need to gather as much information as possible about the patient's condition. What is wrong with the patient (the diagnosis)? What is likely to happen to the patient because of the disease or medical condition (the prognosis)? If the doctors are unsure of the diagnosis or prognosis, you need to know when they will know more and what they are doing to get more information.

    Sometimes the process of obtaining information involves invasive and uncomfortable testing, and you will need to decide if the process should go forward. For example, you may know that the patient would not have wanted invasive testing, or you may decide that the burdens of testing and or treatment outweigh any likely benefits.

    Therefore, information about the patient's prognosis is particularly important. What, given the present situation, is the most likely outcome? Although the outcome may never be known absolutely, you can ask what chance the patient has to return to his or her previous condition, or if that is not realistic, what is the best outcome that could be expected? The worst?

    If the doctor says the patient may improve with treatment, what does "improve" mean? To a doctor "improve" might mean survival, but with serious brain damage. You may know that the patient would not want treatment if that was the most likely outcome.

    If the doctor says that the patient has a treatable condition, such as pneumonia, but this treatment cannot affect the underlying disease, such as advanced Alzheimer's disease, you may know that the patient would not want life prolonged under these circumstances. Or you might decide that because of other aspects of the patient's condition (for example, advanced cancer), further treatment would only prolong the patient's dying in an uncomfortable or painful condition.

    1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17

    Hot Topics

    WebMD Video: Now Playing

    Click here to wach video: Dirty Truth About Hand Washing

    Which sex is the worst about washing up? Why is it so important? We’ve got the dirty truth on how and when to wash your hands.

    Click here to watch video: Dirty Truth About Hand Washing

    Popular Slideshows & Tools on WebMD

    disciplining a boy
    Types, symptoms, causes.
    fruit drinks
    Eat these to think better.
    Balding man in mirror
    Treatments & solutions.
    No gym workout
    Moves to help control blood sugar.
    Remember your finger
    Are you getting more forgetful?
    acupuncture needle on shoulder
    10 tips to look and feel good.
    Close up of eye
    12 reasons you're distracted.
    birth control pills
    Which kind is right for you?
    embarrassed woman
    Do you feel guilty after eating?
    woman biting a big ice cube
    Habits that wreck your teeth.
    pacemaker next to xray
    Treatment options.
    Pink badge on woman chest to support breat cancer
    Myths and facts.

    Pollen counts, treatment tips, and more.

    It's nothing to sneeze at.

    Loading ...

    Sending your email...

    This feature is temporarily unavailable. Please try again later.

    Thanks!

    Now check your email account on your mobile phone to download your new app.

    Women's Health Newsletter

    Find out what women really need.