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4. Vitamin D

How much you need: 600 IU daily

Why you need it: It helps your body absorb calcium better.

You can also find it in: Salmon, cheese, egg yolks, and vitamin-D fortified foods such as milk, cereal, and orange juice.

Too Nauseous to Take Them?

If you have morning sickness and can’t swallow a prenatal vitamin or keep it down, don’t worry, Dayal says.

“I’ve seen women experience a lot of guilt about that, but if there are a few days or weeks when you can’t take it, it’s not going to make your baby have a problem,” she says. “Just take it as often as you can throughout your pregnancy.”

You may find that different forms of prenatals, such as gummies or chewables, are easier to swallow -- or chew, in this case. If you do take the gummy or chewable prenatal vitamins, make sure they have the same key ingredients as the regular prenatal vitamins. If they lack some of those nutrients, ask your doctor how to make up for this.

Many women also feel less queasy when they pop a prenatal before bed. “If you take it before falling asleep, you may be less likely to notice nausea than if you take it during the day,” Dayal says.

It’s still important to pay attention to what you put on your plate. “Your body absorbs vitamins and minerals from foods much better than it does from supplements,” Dayal says. “Plus, food contains nutrients you and your baby need, such as protein and fiber, that you won’t find in a vitamin.”

Check with your doctor when you take supplements so you get the right amount for you and your baby.

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