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  • Question 1/10

    Why do some people have different-colored eyes?

  • Answer 1/10

    Why do some people have different-colored eyes?

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    • Correct Answer:

    It’s not unusual for animals to have different-colored eyes, but heterochromia, as it’s called, is rare in people. Too much or too little pigment in the iris of one of the eyes causes it. That can happen because of genes or an injury to the eye.

  • Question 1/10

    If you were born with an extra finger, it’s most likely:

  • Answer 1/10

    If you were born with an extra finger, it’s most likely:

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    • Correct Answer:

    It’s pretty common to be born with more than 10 fingers or toes. It’s called polydactyly, and it happens to about 1 out of every 1,000 babies. Extra fingers are usually smaller than normal and may not even have bones in them. They’re harmless, and they may run in families. Most often, the extra digit is near the pinky. A surgeon can remove it easily after the child’s 1st birthday.

  • Question 1/10

    People born with tails:

  • Answer 1/10

    People born with tails:

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    It’s rare, but sometimes a baby is born with what looks like a tail. It's really extra spinal bones that grew longer than normal or out of place. A “pseudo tail” may be more common in people born with conditions like spina bifida. A surgeon can often remove it without problems.

  • Question 1/10

    The tissue flap that hangs at the back of your throat helps with:

  • Answer 1/10

    The tissue flap that hangs at the back of your throat helps with:

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    • Correct Answer:

    Experts aren't sure why humans have a uvula and other mammals do not. This strange, tongue-like flap of tissue at the back of your throat makes lots of saliva.

  • Question 1/10

    Who’s more likely to have more than two nipples?

  • Answer 1/10

    Who’s more likely to have more than two nipples?

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    • Correct Answer:

    If you’re a member of the triple nipple club, you’re probably a guy. You could also have more than three. You might mistake the extra(s) for moles or warts.

  • Question 1/10

    Webbed fingers and toes:

  • Answer 1/10

    Webbed fingers and toes:

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    • Correct Answer:

    A doctor usually needs to separate webbed fingers or toes. Sometimes it’s just skin that holds them together. In other cases, though, they share blood vessels and bones. How common is it? About 1 in every 2,500 babies has webbed fingers, or syndactyly.

  • Question 1/10

    It’s OK if your kid has double rows of teeth.

  • Answer 1/10

    It’s OK if your kid has double rows of teeth.

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    • Correct Answer:

    Your school-age kid’s two rows of teeth might look a little weird, but don’t stress too much. About one-third of children still have their baby teeth when their adult ones start to sprout behind them. You’ll usually spot it in the bottom row first. If the baby teeth stick around too long, they can cause crowding and other problems, so talk to your dentist. He may need to take them out, though they often fall out on their own.

  • Question 1/10

    Only boys have Adam’s apples.

  • Answer 1/10

    Only boys have Adam’s apples.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Some girls have them, too! That small, round bump in the front of the throat is actually the voice box, or larynx, which grows during puberty. In boys, the voice box grows bigger, which is why you can see their Adam’s apples. It’s also what makes their voices deeper.

  • Question 1/10

    Some dimples go away as you get older.

  • Answer 1/10

    Some dimples go away as you get older.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Those cute hollows in your baby’s cheeks might not always be there. Dimples happen where the muscles in your face meet. You can see them when one of the larger muscles moves. But they can change over time or disappear. If you have dimples, you’re more likely to have kids with them.

  • Question 1/10

    What does your appendix do?

  • Answer 1/10

    What does your appendix do?

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    • Correct Answer:

    Your appendix has long been thought of as a bit of a slacker. Some experts think it doesn’t even have a job. After all, you’ll be fine without it. But some scientists think the appendix stores good bacteria until we need them for digesting food.

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Sources | Reviewed by William Blahd, MD on June 16, 2016 Medically Reviewed on June 16, 2016

Reviewed by William Blahd, MD on
June 16, 2016

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

  1. Getty Images

SOURCES:

American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons: “Children’s Clubfoot: Treatment with Casting or Operation?”

Atkins, Maestrello, Miller and Associates Pediatric Dentists: “What If My Child Has Two Rows of Teeth?”

Boston Children’s Hospital: “Polydactyly of Fingers," “Synactyly.”

Dermatology Online Review: “Supernumerary nipple and seminoma: Case report and review of polythelia and genitourinary cancers.”

Donovan, D. Pediatric Neurosurgery , January 2005.

Duke Medicine: “Appendix Isn't Useless at All: It's a Safe House for Bacteria.”

Hamoud, K. Spine , Sept. 1, 2011.

International Association of Pediatric Dentistry: “Children, 6 to 9 years of age.”

Kidshealth.org:  “Appendicitis,” “What’s an Adam’s Apple?”

National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse:  “Appendicitis.”

National Human Genome Research Institute: “Polydactyly Research Study.”

Pediatric Dermatology: “Supernumerary Nipples: An Overview.”

Seattle Children’s Hospital: “Polydactyly.”

Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children: “Syndactyly.”

The Tech Museum of Innovation: “Eye Color.”

University of Utah Health Sciences: “Observable Human Genetics.”

Wisegeek.org: “What are dimples?”

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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