Skip to content

Smoking Fewer Cigarettes

Font Size

Topic Overview

Reduced smoking is a conscious change in the amount you smoke. It can prepare you to quit smoking at a later date, even if the quit date doesn't come for a long time. Reduced smoking has some limitations, and it should not be a goal itself, because it is not clear that it reduces the health risks of smoking.

  • People who smoke only a few cigarettes have more health problems than people who do not smoke.
  • People who cut back on the number of cigarettes they smoke tend to change their puffing patterns so they get more nicotine out of each cigarette. This process is called nicotine compensation.
  • It may be difficult to maintain a reduced rate of smoking over time.
  • It is best to use reduced smoking as a step toward quitting, not as an end in itself.

If you reduce your smoking as a step towards quitting, this may help you quit for good. Gradually cutting down the number of cigarettes you smoke and going longer without smoking can help you feel more in control of your smoking. You will be less dependent on nicotine, which can make it easier to quit.

Recommended Related to Smoking Cessation

Treatment for Adult ALL in Remission

Standard Treatment Options for Adult ALL in Remission Standard treatment options for adult ALL in remission include the following: Postremission therapy, including the following: Chemotherapy.Ongoing treatment with a Bcr-abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor such as imatinib, nilotinib, or dasatinib.Autologous or allogeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT). Central nervous system (CNS) prophylaxis therapy, including the following:Cranial radiation therapy plus intrathecal (IT) methotrexate.High-dose...

Read the Treatment for Adult ALL in Remission article > >

Methods to reduce smoking

Methods to reduce smoking include the following:

  • Each week choose a few specific cigarettes to give up (for example, the ones you smoke in the car on your way to work).
  • Gradually increase the time between cigarettes.
  • Smoke only during odd or even hours.
  • Limit your smoking to certain places (outside, not at work, not in the car).
  • Wait as late in the day as possible to start smoking.
  • Try going one day without smoking.

In research studies, nicotine replacement therapy medicines helped smokers reduce the amount they smoked. But using nicotine replacement therapy for this purpose has not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Your doctor can advise you about using medicine to reduce your smoking.

1

WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: August 15, 2013
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
Next Article:

Smoking Fewer Cigarettes Topics

Hot Topics

WebMD Video: Now Playing

Click here to wach video: Dirty Truth About Hand Washing

Which sex is the worst about washing up? Why is it so important? We’ve got the dirty truth on how and when to wash your hands.

Click here to watch video: Dirty Truth About Hand Washing

Popular Slideshows & Tools on WebMD

feet
Solutions for 19 types.
MS Overview
Recognizing symptoms.
pregnancy test and calendar
Helping you get pregnant.
man rubbing painful knee
A visual guide.
lone star tick
How to identify that bite.
woman standing behind curtains
How it affects you.
brain scan with soda
Tips to avoid complications.
row of colored highlighter pens
Tips for living better.
human lungs
Symptoms, causes, treatments.
woman dreaming
What Do Your Dreams Say About You?
two male hands
Test your knowledge.

Women's Health Newsletter

Find out what women really need.