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    Vitamin A (Retinoid)

    Vitamin A is key for good vision, a healthy immune system, and cell growth. There are two types of vitamin A. This entry is primarily about the active form of vitamin A -- retinoids -- that comes from animal products. Beta-carotene is among the second type of vitamin A, which comes from plants.

    The American Heart Association recommends obtaining antioxidants, including beta-carotene, by eating a well-balanced diet high in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains rather than from supplements until more is known about the risks and benefits of supplementation.

    High doses of antioxidants (including vitamin A) may actually do more harm than good. Vitamin A supplementation alone, or in combination with other antioxidants, is associated with an increased risk of mortality from all causes, according to an analysis of multiple studies.

    Why do people take vitamin A?

    Topical and oral retinoids are common prescription treatments for acne and other skin conditions, including wrinkles. Oral vitamin A is also used as a treatment for measles and dry eye in people with low levels of vitamin A. Vitamin A is also used for a specific type of leukemia.

    Vitamin A has been studied as a treatment for many other conditions, including cancers, cataracts, and HIV. However, the results are inconclusive.

    Most people get enough vitamin A from their diets. However, a doctor might suggest vitamin A supplements to people who have vitamin A deficiencies. People most likely to have vitamin A deficiency are those with diseases (such as digestive disorders) or very poor diets.

    How much vitamin A should you take?

    The recommended dietary allowance (RDA) includes the vitamin A you get from both the food you eat and any supplements you take.

    Category

    Vitamin A: Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) in micrograms (mcg) of Retinol Activity Equivalents (RAE)

    CHILDREN

    1-3 years

    300 mcg/day
    (or 1,000 International Units/day)

    4-8 years

    400 mcg/day
    (1,320 IU/day)

    9-13 years

    600 mcg/day
    (2,000 IU/day)

    FEMALES

    14 years and up

    700 mcg/day
    (2,310 IU/day)

    Pregnant

    14-18 years: 750 mcg/day (2,500 IU/day)

    19 years and over: 770 mcg/day (2,565 IU/day)

    Breastfeeding

    Under 19 years: 1,200 mcg/day (4,000 IU/day)

    19 years and over: 1,300 mcg/day (4,300 IU/day)

    MALES

    14 years and up

    900 mcg/day
    (3,000 IU/day)

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