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Talk to the Teacher continued...

Ask for access to the schedule. You may want to get a second set of books to keep at home, too. Also, discuss varied teaching methods that can keep your child interested.

If you already have a 504 Plan or an individualized education program (IEP) set up, go over it with the new teacher.

  • A 504 plan guarantees that kids with special needs get accommodations in the classroom. What those are depend on the child.
  • An IEP covers more than a 504 plan, but it's also more complex. It might also mean your child won't be in a regular classroom.

Find out how much homework the teacher plans to assign each night. You may want to ask for extra help to make sure your child can finish all of his assignments, or for extra time on tests.

Figure out how you and the teacher will stay in touch during the school year.

Getting Started at a New School

Is your child starting middle or high school? Did you move over the summer? A big change like that can be hard for a child or teen with ADHD.

Make it easier by reaching out to the school before classes start. Help the new school match your child with the classes and teachers that fit his abilities and learning style.

Call the school and arrange to share report cards, test scores, and notes from last year. Meet with the guidance counselor and your child's teachers. You may need to update his 504 Plan or IEP, or make a new one.

Ask the guidance counselor to take you and your child on a tour of the new school. Meet with teachers, the principal, the nurse, and anyone else your child will see daily. Walk through the whole school day with your child so he knows where he needs to go and when.

Advance planning and practice, along with familiar routines at home, will help you both get used to this change.