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Clinical Trials and ADHD

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Risks Involved in Clinical Trials

While clinical trials have risks for the people who take part, each study also takes steps to protect patients. Only you can decide whether taking part in a clinical trial is worthwhile. The possible benefits and risks should be considered carefully.

Questions You Should Ask Your Doctor About a Clinical Trial

  • What is the purpose of the study?
  • What has previous research of this treatment shown?
  • What is likely to happen in my case with or without the treatment?
  • Are there standard treatments for this condition?
  • How does this study compare with standard treatment options?

Clinical Trials for Childhood ADHD

Many trials for the diagnosis and treatment of ADHD in children have been conducted. These have included trials measuring drug treatment, behavioral treatment, and/or combined treatments for children. Some clinical trials involving children have tested the potential roles that lead exposure, exposure to other neurotoxins, and psychosocial situations (involving aspects of social and psychological behavior) might play in causing ADHD.

You Can Learn More

For the most current listing of clinical trials in the field of ADHD, please consult the website www.clinicaltrials.gov and conduct a search under the term ADHD.

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WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Patricia Quinn, MD on September 21, 2012
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