Glossary of ADHD Terms

Do you know these some common terms about ADHD?

ADHD, combined type: The most common type of the disorder. People with this type of ADHD have inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity.

ADHD, predominantly hyperactive-impulsive type: With this type, people have both hyperactive and impulsive behavior, but they may not show enough symptoms of inattention to fall into the combined type.

ADHD, predominantly inattentive type: People with this type have inattention but not hyperactive or impulsive behavior. This type of ADHD was formerly known as attention deficit disorder (ADD).

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): A developmental and behavioral disorder. People that have ADHD have inattention, distractibility, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. Typically, symptoms are significant enough to cause problems in everyday life.

Attention deficit disorder (ADD): This is the former name of ADHD, predominantly inattentive type. The term ADD is no longer used.

Executive function deficit: Executive function is a set of mental skills that make sure things get done. Someone with an executive function deficit has a hard time planning or starting tasks and seeing them through. People with ADHD often have this deficit.

Clinical trial: Also called a research study, they test how well new approaches work in people. Clinical trials may compare a new treatment to a treatment that is already available.

Neural: Related to the nervous system.

Neurotransmitter: A chemical in the brain that acts as a messenger to help transmit nerve impulses between brain cells.

Nonstimulants: This type of medication is sometimes used to treat symptoms of ADHD. They work by decreasing impulsive behavior or improving attention span.

Psychostimulants or Stimulants: These medicines are often prescribed for people with ADHD. They affect dopamine activity in the brain and can help them focus their thoughts and ignore distractions.

 

WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari, MD on May 01, 2017

Sources

SOURCES:

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "NINDS Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder Information Page."

National Institute of Mental Health: "Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)."

Familydoctor.org: "Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)."

News release, Pfizer.

Understood: “Understanding Executive Function Issues.”

Additude: "Executive-Function Deficits in Children.”

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