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Protecting Your Child From Dangerous Allergies

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Anaphylaxis is always a medical emergency.

Anaphylaxis is always a medical emergency.

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Explanation: Anaphylaxis is a serious, whole-body allergic reaction that usually comes on fast. Even if it starts off mild, it can quickly become life threatening. That's why it's important to treat it immediately. If you have prescription epinephrine, use it right away. Then call 911.

What often triggers anaphylaxis?

What often triggers anaphylaxis?

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Explanation: Any allergy trigger can cause anaphylaxis, although food is most often to blame. Other triggers are insect stings, medicines such as penicillin, and, less often, latex. Latex can be found in some gloves, balloons, and other items. Knowing your child's triggers can help her avoid them. An allergist can do tests to find out the exact cause and create a treatment plan for your child.

Kids should never give themselves an epinephrine shot.

Kids should never give themselves an epinephrine shot.

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Explanation: It's important for you to know when and how to use epinephrine because it can save your child's life. But you may not always be around when your child has a reaction. If your child is old enough, teach her how to give herself an epinephrine shot. Show relatives, friends, teachers, and caregivers how to use it, too.

Vomiting and diarrhea can be symptoms of anaphylaxis.

Vomiting and diarrhea can be symptoms of anaphylaxis.

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Explanation: With anaphylaxis, your body reacts in all kinds of ways. You can have swelling, hives, and redness, and even vomiting or diarrhea. You could faint, which could lead to shock. If your child's airways tighten, they may start to wheeze or have problems breathing. That's why it's important to be prepared and ready to treat it right away.

If your child shows symptoms of anaphylaxis, you should

If your child shows symptoms of anaphylaxis, you should

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Explanation: Don't wait! Epinephrine almost always works when it's injected right away. Anyone who is with your child — including teachers and caregivers — should have an injector on hand and know how and when to use it.

You don't need to call 911 if symptoms get better right away with epinephrine.

You don't need to call 911 if symptoms get better right away with epinephrine.

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Explanation: Always call 911 right away after you use an epinephrine shot. Minutes count. Don't drive your child to a hospital yourself. Even if his symptoms go away, he needs emergency care to make sure they don't return. At the hospital, he may get other medication to open his airways, if he needs it.

Your child's epinephrine shot should stay safely locked in the nurse's office.

Your child's epinephrine shot should stay safely locked in the nurse's office.

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Explanation: The best place for your child's auto—injector is with him — not locked away somewhere. That way no time is wasted going to get it in an emergency. Have your child wear a medic alert bracelet, too, so that people know he carries epinephrine. Caregivers and teachers should also have a copy of your child's emergency action plan.

How often should you replace an epinephrine injector?

How often should you replace an epinephrine injector?

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Explanation: An expired epinephrine shot may not work right. Keep track of the expiration dates on all your child's injectors and replace them before they expire. Take old, used, or discolored epinephrine to a doctor's office or hospital to be thrown away.

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Your Score:  – You correctly answered  out of  questions.

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You know what you're doing when it comes to your child and anaphylaxis.

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