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Allergies Health Center

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How to Treat Minor Cuts and Scrapes

The small hazards that can lead to minor cuts and scrapes are a part of everyday life. All it takes is one slip of focus while slicing bread and you've cut your finger. Or you trip on a curb and skin your knee.

Get immediate medical attention for a wound that is deep, bleeds heavily, or has something embedded in it. If it's a minor cut or scrape, here's what to do:

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Clean the Cut

First wash your hands with soap and water.

Then rinse the cut or scrape with cool water to remove dirt and debris. Hold the area under running water or pour clean water over it from a cup. Use soap to clean the wound.

You don't need to use stronger cleaning solutions -- such as hydrogen peroxide, iodine, or rubbing alcohol -- to treat minor cuts and scrapes, as they may irritate the wound. Cool clean water should be fine for cleaning the wound.

Stop the Bleeding

A small amount of blood can help clean out the wound. Smaller cuts and abrasions usually stop bleeding on their own. A cut to the head or hand may bleed more because those areas have a lot of blood vessels.

To stop the bleeding, gently apply firm, direct pressure using a clean cloth or gauze. Continue to hold the pressure steadily.

Don’t raise the cloth or gauze to check on the wound, because that could cause the wound to start bleeding again. If blood seeps through the dressing, just put more on top and keep applying pressure.

If the cut is on your hand or arm, you can help slow the bleeding by raising it above your head.

If the cut spurts blood or if it doesn’t stop bleeding, get medical help right away.

When to Call the Doctor

Most minor cuts and abrasions don’t need a doctor's care. But call your doctor if:

  • The wound is on your face.
  • The edges of the cut are jagged or gape open, the cut is deep (1/4 inch or more), or you can see fat or muscle. These are signs that you may need stitches.
  • You can't get all of the dirt or debris out of the wound, or the wound was caused by something very dirty or rusty.
  • You have a puncture wound or a cut and haven't had a tetanus shot in the past 5 years.
  • The wound is from an animal or human bite.
  • The injured area feels numb.

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