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Best Diet for Nasal Allergies

Certain foods and drinks can make allergy symptoms worse -- or better.
By
WebMD Feature
Reviewed by Laura J. Martin, MD

Could what you're eating affect your nasal allergies? It's possible. Here are some tips on which foods may help your nasal allergy symptoms -- and which foods are making them worse.

Foods That May Help

Recommended Related to Allergies

3 Questions About Pollen Allergies

Do you suffer from frequent sneezing, congestion, watery eyes, and an itchy, runny nose? If so, you may have seasonal allergic rhinitis, often called hay fever. It strikes when pollen starts to fly. About 18 million U.S. adults and more than 7 million children suffer from hay fever, according to the CDC. Fortunately, there are steps people with allergies can take to avoid pollen and the misery that accompanies it, says Andy W. Nish, MD, of the Allergy & Asthma Care Center in Gainesville, Ga...

Read the 3 Questions About Pollen Allergies article > >

  • Warm fluids. Whether you're sipping tea or eating chicken soup, warm fluids help break up congestion in your airways, making it easier to cough up mucus.
  • Fish. Will a tuna sandwich stop your sneezing? Probably not. But some studies suggest that healthy omega-3 fatty acids -- found in fish like tuna, salmon, and mackerel -- could lower the risk of developing allergies. Other studies have disagreed.
  • Yogurt. Some research shows that healthy bacteria called probiotics -- found in yogurt -- may slightly reduce pollen allergy symptoms in kids. More research needs to be done.
  • Honey. Taking a teaspoon of honey is a common treatment for allergies. Does it really work? Studies haven't shown any benefit. But since it's low-risk, you could see if it helps. Don't give honey to kids under 1 year old.

Foods That Make Symptoms Worse

  • Food allergens. Food allergies -- to peanuts, or strawberries, or anything else -- can cause symptoms like hives or swelling. But in some people, food allergies can cause nasal symptoms, like congestion. If you notice a connection between congestion and certain foods, ask your doctor and get tested.
  • Certain fruits and vegetables. Some fruits and vegetables contain proteins that are very similar to those in certain pollens. So if you're allergic to pollen, a food with similar proteins could set off an allergic reaction in your mouth. It's called oral allergy syndrome.
    For instance, people with ragweed allergy might have symptoms when they eat melons or tomatoes. People with grass allergies may react to peaches or celery. Ask your doctor if any foods are likely to trigger your allergy symptoms.
  • Beer or wine. In some people, drinking alcohol -- especially beer or wine -- can trigger nasal congestion.

Reviewed on November 14, 2012

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