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Will Moving Help My Child's Allergies?

By Brian Vickery
WebMD Magazine - Feature
Reviewed by Laura J. Martin, MD

Q: Should we move to help my daughter's spring allergies?

A: Moving from a humid area to an arid one may help with allergies to house dust mites, but not with outdoor allergies. Even in bone-dry regions, grasses, olive and mesquite trees, and weeds (including ragweed) grow well and release their pollen into the wind. Molds (mostly in soil) also grow well. Dry, hot desert air can irritate already inflamed nasal and throat tissues. Consult a board-certified allergist before making any decision to move. -- Brian Vickery, MD, WebMD's Children's Allergies Expert

Recommended Related to Allergies

Fragrance Allergies: A Sensory Assault

Do any of these scenarios sound familiar? You catch a whiff of a co-worker's new fragrance, and within minutes, you have a whopper of a headache. You pop open that new bottle of dish-washing liquid, and by the time you've washed the pots and pans, your hands and arms are covered in hives. You walk into a friend's home and smell freshly baked pumpkin pie. Only after you start sneezing uncontrollably and feeling dizzy, weak, and sick to your stomach do you learn she hasn't been baking...

Read the Fragrance Allergies: A Sensory Assault article > >

Reviewed on October 26, 2012

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