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Allergies Health Center

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Blood Testing for Allergies

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Millions of Americans have allergies. You might sniffle and sneeze as the seasons change or get itchy and teary eyed when you dust the house or pet an animal. Or, perhaps you start wheezing when you eat a particular food.

Allergyblood testing can help reveal what causes -- triggers -- your allergy symptoms and help your doctor choose the best treatment for you.

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Types of Allergy Blood Tests

Allergy blood tests detect and measure the amount of allergen-specific antibodies in your blood. When you come into contact with an allergy trigger, known as an allergen, your body makes antibodies against it.

The antibodies tell cells in your body to release certain chemicals. These chemicals are what cause allergy symptoms. Immunoglobulin E (IgE) is an antibody that's strongly linked to the body's allergy response.

Allergy blood tests usually screen for at least 10 of the most common allergy triggers, including dust, pet dander, trees, grasses, weeds, and molds related to where you live. They are also particularly helpful in diagnosing food allergies.

Allergy blood tests may be referred to as immunoassay tests and include:

  • Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, or EIA)
  • Radioallergosorbent test (RAST)

The ELISA test measures the amount of allergen-specific antibodies in your blood.

The RAST test also looks for specific allergen-related antibodies in order to identify your allergy triggers. Since the introduction of the ELISA test, RAST testing has not typically been used.

Allergies can cause an increase in certain types of white blood cells. Blood tests to check your white blood cell counts, including a count of a type of white cell called an eosinophil, may also be done if your doctor thinks you have allergies. However, it is important to keep in mind that many other health conditions can cause an increase in white blood cells.

Other blood tests may be ordered that measure the release of chemicals responsible for allergic reactions.

Why Allergy Blood Tests Are Done

Allergy skin testing is the preferred method, but in some cases blood testing may be ordered.

Allergy blood testing is recommended if you:

  • Are using a medicine known to interfere with test results and cannot stop taking it for a few days. This would include antihistamines, steroids, and certain antidepressants.
  • Cannot tolerate the many needle scratches required for skin testing.
  • Have an unstable heart condition.
  • Have poorly controlled asthma.
  • Have severe eczema, dermatitis, psoriasis, or another severe skin condition.
  • Might have an extreme reaction during skin testing or have a history of life-threatening allergic reaction called anaphylaxis.

Your doctor may also order blood testing to determine how well your allergy treatments (immunotherapy) are working. Blood testing may also show whether you have outgrown an allergy.

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