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Skin Reactions to Beauty Products

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Beauty products -- everything from shampoo to makeup to cologne -- can help you feel on top of your game. They can also cause irritated skin or an allergic reaction. In one FDA survey, up to 25% of people said they had a skin reaction to at least one beauty product.

Problems can range from simple rashes to full-blown allergic reactions. Symptoms can start right after you use something new -- or after years of using a product with no problems.

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There are two types of skin reactions to beauty products. One, called irritant contact dermatitis, happens when something actually damages your skin. Your skin might burn, sting, itch, or get red right where you used the product. You might get blisters and have oozing, especially if you scratch.

The other kind of reaction actually involves your immune system. It’s called allergic contact dermatitis and symptoms include redness, swelling, itching, and hives. Your skin can get red and raw. You can get an allergic reaction on any part of your body, although it happens most often on the face, lips, eyes, ears, and neck.

It can be hard to tell the two types of reactions apart. You can even have a reaction that’s a combination of the two.

Fragrances and preservatives are often to blame. Even products that say they are "unscented" can have a fragrance used to cover up chemical scents. You may not smell it, but it's there, and may cause an allergic reaction.

To be sure there's no perfume, look for products marked "fragrance-free" or "without perfume."

Almost any product that has water must have some preservatives. The most common are parabens, imidazolidinyl urea, Quaternium-15, DMDM hydantoin, phenoxyethanol, methylchloroisothiazolinone, and formaldehyde. All have been linked to skin allergies.

Beauty Products to Watch for

The beauty products most likely to cause skin reactions include bath soaps, detergents, antiperspirants, eye makeup, moisturizers, shampoos, long-wearing lip stains, nail polish (especially those that have formaldehyde), and fingernail glue containing methcrylate.

Hair dyes can also cause skin reactions, especially those containing p-phenylenediamine as well as ammonium persulfate used to lighten hair.

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