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Allergies Health Center

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Urticaria, Papular

It is possible that the main title of the report Urticaria, Papular is not the name you expected. Please check the synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and disorder subdivision(s) covered by this report.


  • Angioedema and Urticaria
  • Giant Urticaria
  • Hives, Giant
  • Lichen Urticatus
  • Quincke Syndrome

Disorder Subdivisions

  • None

General Discussion

Papular urticaria, usually called hives, is characterized by large numbers of very itchy red bumps (papules) that come and go every few days over a period of a month or so. The bumps are usually between 0.2 and 2 cm. in size and some may develop into fluid-filled blisters (bullae). This condition is usually triggered by allergic reactions to insect bites, sensitivity to drugs, or other environmental causes. In some cases, swelling of the soft tissues of the face, neck, and hands (angioedema) may also occur.

Because it is difficult for children and adults to resist scratching these itchy crusted bumps, the possibility of infection is great and caution must be taken. Papular urticaria may accompany, or even be the first symptom of various viral infections including hepatitis, infectious mononucleosis, or German measles (rubella). Some acute reactions are unexplained, even when recurrent.


NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
Office of Communications and Government Relations
6610 Rockledge Drive, MSC 6612
Bethesda, MD 20892-6612
Tel: (301)496-5717
Fax: (301)402-3573
Tel: (866)284-4107
TDD: (800)877-8339

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology
611 East Wells Street
Milwaukee, WI 53202
Tel: (414)272-6071
Fax: (414)276-3349
Tel: (800)822-2762

Genetic and Rare Diseases (GARD) Information Center
PO Box 8126
Gaithersburg, MD 20898-8126
Tel: (301)251-4925
Fax: (301)251-4911
Tel: (888)205-2311
TDD: (888)205-3223

For a Complete Report:

This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be downloaded free from the NORD website for registered users. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational therapies (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, go to and click on Rare Disease Database under "Rare Disease Information".

The information provided in this report is not intended for diagnostic purposes. It is provided for informational purposes only. NORD recommends that affected individuals seek the advice or counsel of their own personal physicians.

It is possible that the title of this topic is not the name you selected. Please check the Synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and Disorder Subdivision(s) covered by this report

This disease entry is based upon medical information available through the date at the end of the topic. Since NORD's resources are limited, it is not possible to keep every entry in the Rare Disease Database completely current and accurate. Please check with the agencies listed in the Resources section for the most current information about this disorder.

For additional information and assistance about rare disorders, please contact the National Organization for Rare Disorders at P.O. Box 1968, Danbury, CT 06813-1968; phone (203) 744-0100; web site or email

Last Updated: 4/20/2008
Copyright 1986, 1987, 1989, 1997, 2006 National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc.

WebMD Medical Reference from the National Organization for Rare Disorders

Last Updated: May 28, 2015
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.

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