Skip to content

Alzheimer's Disease Health Center

Font Size

Managing Complications of Alzheimer's Disease

Alzheimer's disease often begins with memory loss. But as the disease grows more severe, it can cause many other mental, emotional, and physical problems.

Here are some ways to manage complications that your loved one with Alzheimer's may face.

Recommended Related to Alzheimer's

David Hyde Pierce: Advocate for Alzheimer's Research

David Hyde Pierce's longest-running role to date has been as an advocate for Alzheimer's disease awareness and research. Best known as Niles Crane, the character he played for 11 years on NBC's hit sitcom Frasier (as well as his 2008 Tony for the Broadway musical Curtains), Pierce originally got involved with the Alzheimer's cause for very personal reasons. The disease claimed his grandfather, and his father likely suffered from Alzheimer's disease as well. November is National Alzheimer's...

Read the David Hyde Pierce: Advocate for Alzheimer's Research article > >

Agitation and Aggression

You may see someone with Alzheimer's act anxious or upset. When they're feeling this way, they may fidget, shout, throw things, or try to hit other people. To help keep your loved one calm:

Keep their surroundings quiet. Background noise, such as from a television, can upset people with Alzheimer's.

Settle into a routine. Changes in their environment and to their daily routine, such as travel or the appearance of guests, can make your loved one agitated.

Check for causes of discomfort. Pain, fatigue, or a need to use the restroom could make them unsettled or trigger an outburst.

Stay calm. Avoid arguing with someone who has Alzheimer's.

Bladder and Bowel Issues

People with Alzheimer's tend to have trouble controlling their bladder and bowels. That's especially true when the disease grows more severe. To prevent and manage accidents:

  • Take your loved one to the restroom every few hours.
  • Be aware of signs of needing to go, including fidgeting and clutching clothing.
  • When you're away from home, know where the restrooms are.
  • Encourage them to drink less fluid close to bedtime.

Depression

Many people with Alzheimer's become depressed, especially soon after they develop the disease. Antidepressant drugs may help. Your loved one is less likely to become depressed if they:

  • Get regular exercise
  • Spend more time around other people
  • Stay busy with hobbies and activities they enjoy

Falls

People with Alzheimer's are more likely to lose their balance and fall, which can cause serious harm. To help prevent falls and injuries in the home:

  • Encourage regular exercise, especially early in the disease, to help your loved one keep their balance and muscle strength.
  • Remove objects that are easy to trip on, such as loose rugs or extension cords.
  • Be sure stairways have at least one handrail.
  • Place non-skid strips in the bathtub and on smooth flooring.
  • Install night-lights.
  • Place easy-to-see stickers on large windows and sliding-glass doors to make it obvious that something solid is there.

Infections

Many people with Alzheimer's disease die of other problems, including bladder infections, flu, and pneumonia. You can help prevent infections and get prompt treatment for complications by taking these steps for your loved one:

  • Talk to their doctor about getting a flu shot for them each year.
  • A one-time pneumonia shot after age 65 is also a good idea.
  • Cranberry juice or capsules may help protect against urinary tract infections.
  • Watch for sudden changes in symptoms or behaviors, or a fever. These can point to an infection.

 

Today on WebMD

Remember your finger
When it’s more than just forgetfulness.
senior man with serious expression
Which kinds are treatable?
 
senior man
Common symptoms to look for.
mri scan of human brain
Can drinking red wine reverse the disease?
 
senior man
ARTICLE
daughter and father
ARTICLE
 
Making Diagnosis
Article
Colored mri of brain
ARTICLE
 
Close up of elderly couple holding hands
VIDEO
senior woman with lost expression
ARTICLE
 
Woman comforting ailing mother
ARTICLE
Alzheimers Dementia
ARTICLE