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Alzheimer's Disease Health Center

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How Alzheimer's Progresses

Changes in the brain of someone with Alzheimer's may start a decade or more before they have any symptoms of the disease -- long before anyone realizes there's a problem.

As the disease causes more damage in the brain, symptoms begin to appear. Forgetfulness is often the first symptom of mild Alzheimer's disease. Often, people with mild Alzheimer's get lost in familiar settings, have trouble finding their keys and other items, and ask the same questions repeatedly.

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The disease becomes worse over time. The person with Alzheimer's moves to a moderate stage of the disease and then a severe stage. This decline often takes several years.

Signs of Moderate Alzheimer's

During moderate Alzheimer's, the damage affects parts of the brain that control different functions. You may notice these things when someone you care about has moderate Alzheimer's:

Memory. He or she may forget details about their past.

Difficulty with chores. Someone with Alzheimer's may have trouble doing tasks with multiple steps, such as:

  • Cleaning the house
  • Getting dressed
  • Using the telephone

Communication problems. Your friend or relative might:

  • Have trouble finding the right word
  • Lose track of what they were planning to say
  • Struggle to understand what other people are saying to them

Behavior issues. People with moderate Alzheimer's may:

  • Become frustrated or angry more easily
  • See or hear things that aren't really there
  • Seem paranoid about unreal threats
  • Act impulsively
  • Wander away from home and get lost

During the moderate stage of Alzheimer's, people with Alzheimer's can still remember details about their lives and the people around them. They can take care of some tasks on their own.

But at this stage, they will need help from a caregiver -- such as a friend or family member -- to keep them clean, safe, and calm. Although they can be somewhat independent, they may no longer be able to live on their own.

They are not able to drive at this point, so they will need someone to take them to doctor visits and do other errands with them.

Signs of Severe Alzheimer's

In the severe stage of Alzheimer's, the damage from the disease becomes widespread through the brain. At this stage, your loved one may have these symptoms:

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