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Alzheimer's Disease Health Center

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Alzheimer's Disease: How It’s Diagnosed

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Alzheimer’s disease isn’t part of normal aging. If you think you or a loved one might be showing symptoms of the disease, it’s important to see a doctor to get a diagnosis. Some warning signs to get checked are memory loss, behavior changes, or trouble with speech and decision-making.

But Alzheimer’s has many of the same symptoms as other common conditions, too. Those include depression, poor nutrition, and taking medications that don’t work well together. A doctor can find out if the symptoms are happening because of Alzheimer’s or due to something else that’s easier to treat.

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Alzheimer's Caregivers: Sandwiched Between Parenting Your Kids and Your Parents

There are about 10 million people in the U.S. -- mostly women – who have chosen to take care of a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease. It’s a grueling job in itself, but many aren’t only caregiving. They’re also raising kids of their own -- and maybe working – at the same time. “You’re already a parent to your children, and then suddenly you have to become a caregiver to your parent,” says Donna Schempp, LCSW, program director at the Family Caregiver Alliance in San Francisco. “It’s very hard to...

Read the Alzheimer's Caregivers: Sandwiched Between Parenting Your Kids and Your Parents article > >

An early and accurate diagnosis can also give you or your loved one time to plan for the future. You can start using some medicines that help people in the earlier stages of Alzheimer's control some of their symptoms for a while as well. On average, these drugs keep symptoms from getting worse for about 6 to 12 months in about half of the people who take them.

Getting a Diagnosis

Doctors can’t definitely diagnose Alzheimer's disease until after death, when they can closely examine the brain under a microscope. But they can use tests to rule out other conditions that might cause the same symptoms.

Here’s what you can expect when you or your loved one is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s.

Health History

Your doctor will do a physical exam and ask questions about your past and current health. He’ll want to know:

  • Your symptoms, including any trouble you have with everyday tasks
  • Other medical conditions you have now or had before
  • Medications you take
  • Your personal history, like your marital status, living conditions, employment, sexual history, and important life events
  • Your mental state. The doctor will ask you a series of questions that help him figure out if you’re having a mental health problem, like depression.
  • Family history, including any illnesses that seem to run in the family

Mini Mental State Exam

This is a brief test that checks your:

  • Problem-solving skills
  • Attention span
  • Counting skills
  • Memory

These tests will help your doctor know whether there are problems with the areas of your brain involved in learning, memory, thinking, or planning skills.

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