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Alzheimer's Disease Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Alzheimers

  1. Dementia - What Happens

    How quickly dementia progresses depends on what is causing it and the area of the brain that is affected. Some types of dementia progress slowly over several years. Other types may progress more rapidly.

  2. Dementia - Home Treatment

    Home treatment for dementia involves teamwork among health professionals and caregivers to create a safe and comfortable environment and to make tasks of daily living as easy as possible. A diagnosis of dementia can create feelings of anger, fear, and anx

  3. Dementia - What Increases Your Risk

    Aging is the main risk factor for all types of dementia. Some diseases that cause dementia (such as early-onset Alzheimer's disease and some frontotemporal dementias) may run in families.

  4. Dementia - Symptoms

    Symptoms of dementia vary depending on the cause and the area of the brain that is affected. Memory loss is usually the earliest and most noticeable symptom.

  5. Dementia - Medications

    Doctors use medicines to treat dementia in the following ways: To correct an underlying condition causing dementia, such as thyroid replacement for hypothyroidism, vitamins for lack of thiamine or vitamin B12, or antibiotics for infections. To maintain me

  6. Dementia - Cause

    Learn about dementia and what causes it, including injury to the brain caused by tumors, head injury, or strokes, or diseases, such as Parkinson's disease.

  7. Managing Complications of Alzheimer's Disease

    Find out how to manage complications that your loved one with Alzheimer's may face.

  8. Mild Cognitive Impairment and Dementia - Topic Overview

    Some people have memory loss but do not have dementia. They have what is known as mild cognitive impairment, a middle ground between normal aging and dementia. People with this condition are at risk for developing dementia; but not all people with mild cognitive impairment will progress to dementia.People with mild cognitive impairment often know that they have lost memory, and tests can confirm some loss. But they have normal overall mental functioning and can carry out normal activities of daily living.Doctors should evaluate people with memory loss, and those with mild cognitive impairment should be monitored because of their risk for developing dementia. Several studies are being done to see whether medicine can delay dementia in people who have mild cognitive impairment.

  9. Dementia: Legal Issues - Topic Overview

    A diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease or another dementia often raises some important legal and financial issues for the future. The person with dementia should be involved in these decisions as long as he or she is able and willing to be involved.Obtain professional legal advice as soon as possible. Early in the course of the disease, the person with dementia may be capable of participating in legal and financial planning. State and local bar associations will be able to provide the names of attorneys practicing in your area who deal with these issues.For certain types of legal advice, the Legal Aid Society, the local Area Agency on Aging, or the Alzheimer's Association will be able to help you find legal assistance at low cost.As soon as possible after the condition is diagnosed, talk about writing a living will and assigning a durable power of attorney for health care. These documents will ensure that the person's wishes for medical care, especially life-sustaining treatment, are in

  10. Dementia: Support for Caregivers - Topic Overview

    Taking care of a loved one who has Alzheimer's disease or another dementia can be a difficult, stressful, and tiring job. It affects the caregiver's health and ability to rest and can be a source of stress and conflict for the entire household.The demands of caring for a person who has dementia may cut off caregivers from friends, leisure activities, and other responsibilities. For a caregiver who has health problems, the physical and emotional strain of caregiving can make those problems worse. Fatigue, depression, and sleep problems commonly develop, and caregivers often carry an added emotional burden of feeling worried, guilty, and angry about taking care of the person.If you are a caregiver, you can benefit by learning as much as you can and taking care of yourself.Educate yourself Learn all you can about the type of dementia your loved one has and what the future may bring. Organizations such as the Alzheimer's Association and the Family Caregiver Alliance can provide

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