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Alzheimer's Disease Health Center

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Dementia - Topic Overview

There is no single test for dementia. To diagnose it, your doctor will:

  • Do a physical exam.
  • Ask questions about recent and past illnesses and life events. The doctor will want to talk to a close family member to check details.
  • Ask you to do some simple things that test your memory and other mental skills. Your doctor may ask you to tell what day and year it is, repeat a series of words, or draw a clock face.

The doctor may do tests to look for a cause that can be treated. For example, you might have blood tests to check your thyroid or to look for an infection. You might also have a test that shows a picture of your brain, like an MRI or a CT scan. These tests can help your doctor find a tumor or brain injury. They can also show if there has been shrinking in parts of the brain. This can be a sign of dementia.

There are medicines you can take for dementia. They cannot cure it, but they can slow it down for a while and make it easier to live with.

As dementia gets worse, a person may get depressed or angry and upset. Treatment, such as medicines and counseling, may help. So can getting out more and having an active social life.

If a stroke caused the dementia, there are things you can do to reduce the chance of another stroke. Stay at a healthy weight, exercise, and keep your blood pressure and cholesterol at normal levels. If you have diabetes, keep your blood sugar in your target range.

Keeping both your mind and your body active is a good idea for anyone. So is not smoking.

There are many things you can do to help your loved one be safe at home. For example, get rid of throw rugs, and put handrails in bathrooms to help prevent falls. Post reminder notes around the house. Put a list of important phone numbers by the telephone. You also can help your loved one stay active. Play cards or board games, and take walks.

Work with your loved one to make decisions about the future before dementia gets worse. It is important to write a living will and a durable power of attorney. A living will states the types of medical care your loved one wants. A durable power of attorney lets your loved one pick someone to be the health care agent. This person makes care decisions after your loved one cannot.

Watching a loved one slip away can be sad and scary. Caring for someone with dementia can leave you feeling drained. Be sure to take care of yourself and to give yourself breaks. Ask family members to share the load, or get other help.

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WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: August 11, 2011
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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