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Anxiety & Panic Disorders Health Center

Your Child and Anxiety: School Stress Starts Early

Student Stress Starts Early. The Problem: Premature Pressure by Parents, Peers
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Preventing School Stress: The Bottom Line continued...

Communication also means helping kids learn from their mistakes.

Bryant advises letting kids know that you will help them solve the problems that can lead to misbehaving. "When kids come to expect only punishment, they are not going to tell you what they're doing. There is a balance between setting limits, being open to communicating, and punishment. Limits are different than punishment. I am all for setting limits, but punishment is too often used because parents don't recognize the stress that kids are under. They don't want to [misbehave], but they [don't yet know] how to maintain friendships and relationships with parents despite the [peer] pressure," she says.

Stress means different things at different ages. Here's a rundown on how stress affects children in elementary, middle, and high school.

Elementary School

Elementary-school kids haven't fully learned self-control. They are still honing their social skills. They're learning how to make friends, how to handle aggression, how to control their urges and emotions. If their teachers and parents don't treat these as normal developmental milestones, they can turn into sources of stress.

"Kids starting school are ready to learn -- that's why we start school at this age," DeBord says. "They should be eager and ready to learn, so building on that desire to learn is key. The enjoyment of learning comes naturally to them. Helping them build on that foundation will take them far when they start learning reading and other skills."

Signs of elementary-school stress include:

  • Fears and nightmares. "It's not the thing they fear but the fact that they are more fearful," Bryant says.Stomachaches and headaches. These kinds of complaints show that kids are stressed. "Parents are right in thinking that there is something more to it than a physical illness," Bryant says. "But it is not that the kid is just making it up. They may want to avoid something, but they are really feeling it. It may be their way of trying to cope with too much stress."
  • Negativism and lying. "One way of dealing with this is accepting the lie without exaggerating it as a problem," Bryant advises. "Say, 'It would be nice if that were the case.' You give them credit for a good idea. That can be very effective. The parent doesn't accept the lie and doesn't reject the child's feelings. It keeps the parent and child in conversation. You recognized where the lie came from -- the child really wishes it were true."
  • Withdrawal, regressive behavior, or excessive shyness. Know your child's temperament. Not all children mature at the same pace. Some children are slow to accept new things. "If you know your child angers more easily or gets more aggressive or upset than other children, help them find some kind of outlet," DeBord suggests. If your child needs to move after school, suggest an after-dinner bike ride. If he or she requires something calming, suggest listening to music.

"When you tuck your kids into bed, or at bath time, whenever there is a one-on-one time, use open ended questions and to listen," says DeBord. Kids need something concrete. Instead of saying, 'What did you do today?' ask about lunch, or what story they heard, or which friend they played with today. Say, 'Tell me where you played. Were there balls and equipment? Did you play in groups?"

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