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Coping With the Stigma of Mental Illness

The stigma of mental illness still exists, even though society has become more accepting and understanding of mental health issues in recent years.

Families of people with mental illness can take certain steps to help cope with stigma. These steps include:

Recommended Related to Mental Health

Independent Clergy Support Group

Online * Support for Independent Clergy looking for friendship, fellowship, networking and help in the practical matters of congregational care and governance. This is an ecumenically minded group for those with no denominational ties or from very small denominations, those within the Emergent Church, House-Church and Independent Movements embarking on new and experimal expressions of faith with respect and tolerance for others and diverse positions Website: http://www.facebook.com/groups...

Read the Independent Clergy Support Group article > >

  • Remembering that you and your loved ones have choices: You can decide who to tell about the mental illness and what to tell them.
  • Remembering that you are not alone: Many other people cope with similar situations. People commonly struggle with depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and other mental illnesses.
  • Keeping hope and remembering that treatment works: Safe and effective medications and psychosocial treatments are available, and newer treatments are being developed. As a result, many individuals with mental illness enjoy productive lives.
  • Praising your loved one for seeking help: Mental health treatment can be difficult, as people often need to be patient in trying new medications, coping with side effects, and learning new behaviors. Helping your loved one to feel good about him or herself is important.
  • Remaining active and surrounding yourself with supportive people: Social isolation can be a negative side effect of the stigma linked to mental illness. Isolating and discontinuing enjoyable activities put you at high risk for depression and burnout. Take a risk and try new activities in your community. You may want to investigate the local chapter of NAMI (the National Alliance on Mental Illness) or a volunteer organization.

 

WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Joseph Goldberg, MD on May 31, 2012
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