Skip to content

Arthritis Health Center

Managing Gout Between Flares

Font Size
A
A
A
By
WebMD Feature
Reviewed by David Zelman, MD

An attack of gout can be so painful that most people would do anything to avoid another. Unfortunately, flare-ups often occur. Studies show that people who have suffered a first attack of gout have a 62% chance of suffering another within a year. The odds climb to almost 80% within two years. "Over time, repeated attacks can eat into bone and cartilage, causing permanent damage to affected joints," says rheumatologist Herbert Baraf, MD, clinical professor of medicine at George Washington University.

Gout occurs when uric acid levels rise too high in the bloodstream. Excess uric acid is deposited as crystals around cartilage and bone. Acute attacks, sometimes called gouty arthritis, occur when these deposits become inflamed and intensely painful.

Recommended Related to Arthritis

Adult-Onset Still's Disease

Adult-onset Still's disease is an inflammatory disease that may affect many joints, internal organs, and other parts of the body. Adult Still's develops most often in people before age 45, but can first occur in later years as well. The cause of Still's is unknown and there are no known risk factors. It is thought that a virus or other type of infectious agent may trigger Still's disease, but there is no proof. Although some features are similar, adult-onset Still's disease is different than Still's...

Read the Adult-Onset Still's Disease article > >

For most people, gout attacks can be largely prevented with proper treatment, experts say. "The biggest problem we see is undertreatment," Lianne Gensler, MD, assistant clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, told WebMD. "Patients aren't given appropriate medications to prevent flare-ups and complications, or they get don't get adequate doses to control their gout."

After a first gout attack

The first step in avoiding repeated attacks of gout is eliminating factors that can trigger gout. Certain medications can raise uric acid levels too high. These include some commonly used blood pressure pills, chemotherapy for cancer, niacin (vitamin B supplements), and aspirin. In many cases, doctors can prescribe alternative medications that don't increase the risk of gout.

Lifestyle factors can also contribute to gout. To avoid problems, experts recommend:

  • Drinking plenty of fluids to remain well-hydrated.
  • Avoiding excessive alcohol consumption, especially beer. However, moderate wine drinking does not appear to increase your risk of gout.
  • Limiting the amount of organ meats, sardines, anchovies, and red meats you eat. These foods are high in purines.
  • Avoiding sweetened beverages, especially those containing fructose, which have been linked to higher risk of gout.
  • Losing weight if you are overweight or obese.

For some people, eliminating triggers and making lifestyle changes are enough to avoid flare-ups of gouty arthritis. But many people will also need to take a medication to lower uric acid levels.

1 | 2 | 3

Today on WebMD

Mature woman exercise at home
Hint: Warming up first is crucial.
feet with gout
Quiz yourself.
 
woman in pain
One idea? Eat fish to curb inflammation.
senior couple walking
Can you keep your RA from progressing?
 
xray of knees with osteoarthritis
Slideshow
close up of man wearing dress shoes
Slideshow
 
feet with gout
Quiz
close up of red shoe in shoebox
Slideshow
 
salad
Video
two male hands
ARTICLE
 
Woman massaging her neck
Quiz
5 Lupus Risk Factors
Article