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    Eating Right With Limited Mobility

    Your guide from soup to nuts -- or smoothies, as the case may be.
    By
    WebMD Feature
    Reviewed by Cynthia Dennison Haines, MD

    If you're living with arthritis, the simplest tasks can seem Herculean -- especially when they involve preparing and eating meals. You're not alone. Opening a carton of milk, slicing a tomato, or making a sandwich can be overwhelming to the millions of people with arthritis and other conditions that affect mobility -- and yet healthy eating is important.

    So how are you supposed to eat the healthy, balanced diet that your doctors insist is part of your treatment?

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    "Anyone with osteoarthritis or any kind of limitation that affects their ability to walk, use their hands, or their ability to stand, as well as those with decreased general endurance and weakness that's secondary to another disease, can run into trouble when it comes to preparing and eating meals," says Susan Underwood, RN, RD, manager of nutrition services for the Visiting Nurse Service-Choice of New York. (VNS-Choice), a long-term care program serving the elderly and disabled.

    "Someone's ability to cook and prepare meals is compromised if they can't stand or use their hands."

    But simple strategies and tasty tips can help make cooking and eating manageable and enjoyable once again.

    Counting Your Calories

    First things first: "If someone isn't as mobile as they used to be, their total energy decreases so their calorie needs go down. But if they are still eating the same amount as when they were more mobile, it can lead to weight gain," Underwood says.

    "Over time, they will gain weight and this will exacerbate problems with mobility." That's why the first step is to talk with a registered dietitian or health care provider who can evaluate calorie needs and discuss how best to meet them, she says. The American Dietetic Association can help you find a dietitian near you.

    Harnessing the Power of Protein

    Getting adequate amounts of protein is crucial for the elderly and disabled, Underwood says. "As people get older and older, we become concerned about weight loss and we tend to see decreased protein intake," Underwood explains. "When you don't eat enough protein, you don't just lose fat, you lose lean body mass and muscle that your body burns off for energy, then tissue repair," Underwood explains.

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