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Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Growth Problems - Topic Overview

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) may either speed or slow the natural growth process of the bones on either side of the affected joint, causing uneven bone growth. Children who have JIA may not grow as tall as they would have if they did not have the condition. The growth differences depend on the child's age when the disease started and the number of joints affected. The more joints involved in the disease, the more severe the impairment.

  • Leg length: Different leg lengths are a possible complication if arthritis affects only one knee. The leg that is affected by arthritis may not grow at the same rate as the other leg. So it may be shorter or longer than the unaffected leg.
  • Jaw development: If JIA affects the jaw (temporomandibular) joint, it may cause one or both sides of the lower jawbone to grow more slowly than normal. If the lower jaw does not develop normally, it can lead to difficulty eating. In some cases surgery is needed to restore a more normal jaw function and appearance.

The closer to puberty a child is when symptoms begin, the more likely the child's height will be affected. JIA may also temporarily delay the development of breasts and the growth of body hair.

Recommended Related to Rheumatoid Arthritis

Hand Exercises for Rheumatoid Arthritis

You need your hands to cook, clean, type, and do just about everything else. But you probably don’t think much about how important manual dexterity is unless you have rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or another type of arthritis that attacks your hand and finger joints. RA is a disease in which the body's immune system engages in friendly fire against the joints. It often starts in your hands before spreading to the other joints. “The hands and the feet are usually hit first, and these are the joints...

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    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http:// cancer .gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.

    WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

    Last Updated: June 05, 2012
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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