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Developing an Asthma Action Plan

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Your Asthma Action Plan (Adults and Teens)

You can print out and use WebMD’s asthma action plan (at the end of this article) to record important information about your asthma. You can also use the same form for another family member with asthma, including teenagers. In this online form, you’ll have ample space to record the names and emergency phone numbers of your health care providers and asthma specialists. 

Take this asthma action plan to your asthma doctor at your next visit for help with asthma. Your doctor can fill in the specific asthma medications, dosages, and frequency, depending on your peak flow reading (whether green zone, yellow zone, or red zone).

Each time you use your peak flow meter throughout the day, compare the reading with the percentages on your personal asthma action plan. If your peak flow level puts you in the green zone, you’re all clear. If you’re in the yellow zone, read the instructions your doctor wrote down in how to treat the symptoms. If your peak flow level is the red zone, this is an emergency. Read your doctor’s instructions in how to quickly act to reverse symptoms with asthma medication. If there is no change in your asthma symptoms, go to the emergency room or call 9-1-1.

An Asthma Action Plan for Your Child

You can also print out and use WebMD's asthma action plan (at the end of this article) to record important information about your child’s asthma. Fill in the names and phone numbers of your child’s health care providers. Ask your child’s doctor to fill in the instructions for all asthma medications, dosages, and frequency, depending on your child’s peak flow level (green zone, yellow zone, red zone).

Help your child understand his asthma by reviewing the asthma action plan daily. If your child’s peak flow reading is in the green zone, your child should have no asthma symptoms and medications should be given as listed on the plan. If your child’s peak flow level falls into the yellow zone, check the asthma action plan for the doctor’s instructions. Be sure to contact the doctor or nurse if the medications do not seem to be helping your child.

If your child’s peak flow reading falls into the red zone, this means it’s time to act quickly with the doctor’s instructions. First, read your child’s asthma action plan and make sure you are giving the proper emergency treatment. If this asthma treatment fails to help your child’s asthma symptoms, then go to the emergency room or call 9-1-1.

The asthma action plan outlines everything you need to do for a normal day with no asthma problems to a time of asthma emergency. Make sure your child’s teacher and any other adult caregiver has a copy of this asthma action plan.

Next Article:

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