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    What Is an Asthma Attack?

    An asthma attack is a sudden worsening of asthma symptoms caused by the tightening of muscles around your airways (bronchospasm). During the asthma attack, the lining of the airways also becomes swollen or inflamed and thicker mucus -- more than normal -- is produced. All of these factors -- bronchospasm, inflammation, and mucus production -- cause symptoms of an asthma attack such as difficulty breathing, wheezing, coughing, shortness of breath, and difficulty performing normal daily activities. Other symptoms of an asthma attack may include:

    • Severe wheezing when breathing both in and out
    • Coughing that won't stop
    • Very rapid breathing
    • Chest tightness or pressure
    • Tightened neck and chest muscles, called retractions
    • Difficulty talking
    • Feelings of anxiety or panic
    • Pale, sweaty face
    • Blue lips or fingernails
    • Or worsening symptoms despite use of your medications

    Call 911 if you have any of these symptoms.

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    Asthma Symptoms

    Asthma is characterized by inflammation of the bronchial tubes with increased production of sticky secretions inside the tubes. People with asthma experience symptoms when the airways tighten, inflame, or fill with mucus. Common asthma symptoms include: Coughing, especially at night Wheezing Shortness of breath Chest tightness, pain, or pressure Still, not every person with asthma has the same symptoms in the same way. You may not have all of these symptoms, or...

    Read the Asthma Symptoms article > >

    Some people with asthma may go for extended periods without having an asthma attack or other symptoms, interrupted by periodic worsening of their symptoms, due to exposure to asthma triggers or perhaps from overdoing it as in exercise-induced asthma.

    Mild asthma attacks are generally more common. Usually, the airways open up within a few minutes to a few hours after treatment. Severe asthma attacks are less common but last longer and require immediate medical help. It is important to recognize and treat even mild symptoms of an asthma attack to help you prevent severe episodes and keep asthma under control.

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