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Asthma Medications

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Can Allergy Shots Be Used to Treat Asthma?

Some recent studies have shown that when you give allergy shots (immunotherapy) to children with allergies, not only do their allergy symptoms improve, but they are also less likely to develop asthma. Also, since many cases of asthma are triggered by allergies, it makes sense that if you control the allergies, you will have fewer asthma attacks.

Ask your doctor if you are a candidate for allergy shots.

How Often Will I Have to Take Asthma Drugs?

Asthma can't be cured. How often you need to take your asthma drugs depends on how severe your asthma is and how frequently you have symptoms. For example, if your asthma symptoms occur only with exercise, you may only need to use an inhaler medication prior to exercise. However, most people with asthma need to take medications every daily.

Asthma Medication Guidelines

Asthma medications are the foundation of good asthma control. Learn all you can about your medications. Know what medications are included in your asthma action plan, when these drugs should be taken, their expected results, and what to do when they fail. Here are some general guidelines to keep in mind:

  • Never run out ofasthma medication. Call your pharmacy or doctor's office at least 48 hours before running out of your asthma medications. Know your pharmacy phone number, prescription numbers, and drug names and doses so that you can easily call for refills.
  • Refer to your asthma action plan when deciding how or when to use asthma drugs. This plan is designed so you achieve the best possible asthma control. Make sure you understand and can follow the plan.
  • Wash your hands prior to preparing or taking asthma drugs.
  • Take your time. Double-check the name and dosage of all your asthma medications before using them.
  • Keep your asthma drugs stored according to the instructions given with the prescription.
  • Check liquid medications often. If they have changed color or formed crystals, throw them away and get new ones.
  • Inform your doctor about any other medications you are taking. Some drugs can affect the actions of your asthma medications when taken together. Most asthma medications are very safe. However, side effects can occur and vary depending on the medication and dose. Ask your doctor or pharmacist to describe medication side effects. Report any unusual or severe side effects to your doctor immediately.
  • Most asthma drugs are very safe. However, side effects can occur and vary depending on the drug and dose. Ask your doctor or pharmacist to describe medication side effects. Report any unusual or severe side effects to your doctor immediately.

 

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WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD on April 09, 2012
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