Skip to content

Asthma Health Center

Font Size
A
A
A

Your Job and Occupational Asthma

Occupational Asthma Overview

Asthma is a chronic (long-term, ongoing) inflammation of the breathing passages (bronchi) of the lungs. The inflammation irritates the airway, causing breathing problems. Asthma is triggered by external factors or specific situations. When a person with asthma is exposed to one of his or her triggers, the inflammation worsens and symptoms ensue. Most people with asthma have sudden attacks or periods of bothersome or severe symptoms separated by periods of mild symptoms or no symptoms at all.

Occupational asthma is caused by exposure to a trigger in the workplace. The list of known triggers is long and varied, although they are generally substances that are inhaled.

Some asthma triggers include:

Recommended Related to Asthma

Exercising When You Have Allergic Asthma

Exercise is good for you, and you can exercise safely, even with allergic asthma. A little planning is all it takes to help you breathe easier and stay in shape.

Read the Exercising When You Have Allergic Asthma article > >

  • Contaminants in the air such as smoke, chemicals, vapors (gases), fumes, dust, or other particles
  • Respiratory infections, such as colds and flu (viruses)
  • Allergens in the air such as molds, animal dander, and pollen

Occupational asthma can occur in almost any line of work or any work environment, including offices, stores, hospitals, and medical facilities.

Two types of occupational asthma attacks occur.

  • Aggravation of preexisting asthma: This is by far the most common type. Over time, with regular exposure, you develop hypersensitivity to the trigger. With this underlying asthma, continued exposure to the trigger causes attacks.
  • Irritant asthma: Exposure to certain substances or conditions in the workplace irritates the airways, causing immediate symptoms. Although this is not an allergic-type reaction, the irritation may cause allergy-like or asthma-like symptoms.

Once the attack is triggered, the airways begin to swell and tighten (bronchospasm) and secrete large amounts of mucus. The swelling and extra mucus partially block, or obstruct, the airways. This makes it more difficult to push air out of your lungs (exhale).

Early recognition and avoidance of the asthma trigger is particularly important in occupational asthma.

Because people spend so much time at work, those with occupational asthma tend to have extensive exposure to their trigger by the time the cause of the symptoms is recognized as asthma. The more time you spend exposed to your trigger, the more likely you are to have permanent lung inflammation and airway hypersensitivity.

Occupational asthma is the most common work-related lung disease in developed countries. In up to 15% of people with asthma in the United States, the condition is at least partly related to their work.

WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Luqman Seidu, MD on May 18, 2014

When Is Your Asthma Worse?

When Is Your Asthma Worse?

Take the WebMD Asthma assessment to get Personalized Action Plan

Start Now

Today on WebMD

Lung and bronchial tube graphic
5 common triggers.
group jogging in park
Should you avoid fitness activities?
 
asthma inhaler
Learn about your options.
man feeling faint
What’s the difference?
 
Madison Wisconsin Capitol
Slideshow
woman wearing cpap mask
Article
 
red wine pouring into glass
Slideshow
Woman holding inhaler
Quiz
 

Pollen counts, treatment tips, and more.

It's nothing to sneeze at.

Loading ...

Sending your email...

This feature is temporarily unavailable. Please try again later.

Thanks!

Now check your email account on your mobile phone to download your new app.

Man outdoors coughing
Article
Lung and bronchial tube graphic
Article
 
10 Worst Asthma Cities
Slideshow
runner
Article
 

WebMD Special Sections