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Quiz: What’s Your Asthma IQ?

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Getting mad can trigger an asthma attack.

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Getting mad can trigger an asthma attack.

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Strong emotions like anger can make you breathe faster and set off an asthma attack. Laughing, crying, yelling, and even feeling stress or fear can be triggers.

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If your child has asthma:

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If your child has asthma:

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Recent studies show that most babies and young children outgrow asthma symptoms by school age. But about 40% of kids who had asthma still have it as young adults. They may have a relapse after not having symptoms for a while.

 

Of the 27 million Americans living with asthma, about 7 million are children. Kids can have normal, active lives with proper care. Learn your child’s asthma triggers and work closely with his doctor. Teach your child to care for his asthma and to tell you when he doesn’t feel good. If your child is missing a lot of school, it probably means he needs a better treatment plan.

Many people with asthma also have allergies.

Many people with asthma also have allergies.

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For about half of people with asthma, allergies trigger their flare-ups. Symptoms usually start after breathing in something you’re allergic to, such as dust, pet dander, pollen, or mold.

 

Asthma attacks can also be set off by breathing in things that you aren’t allergic to, but that may irritate your airways like smoke, household sprays, gasoline fumes, perfumes, or even cold air. Know your asthma triggers to help prevent flare-ups.

A quick-relief inhaler works best:

A quick-relief inhaler works best:

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If you are having an asthma attack, a quick-relief inhaler can help in the moment. But if you have symptoms often, you may also need to take medication daily to help control flare-ups. What counts as often? Either:

  • Three or more times a week
  • Three or more times a month at night

Used alone, quick-relief inhalers do not prevent asthma attacks.

If exercise triggers asthma attacks, you should avoid working out.

If exercise triggers asthma attacks, you should avoid working out.

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Everyone needs exercise, including people with asthma. Exercise can help strengthen your breathing muscles. With the right treatment, you can control your asthma and stay fit.

 

To help control your asthma, your doctor may prescribe a long-term asthma drug and an inhaler to carry with you. You may also want to talk with your doctor to see if using an inhaler before exercise may help.

 

Other tips for working out with asthma: Warm up before you work out and cool down to help with chest tightness.

 

You may also want to avoid outdoor exercise on chilly days, when the pollen or air pollution counts are high, or if you have a respiratory infection.

 You don’t have asthma if you don't wheeze.  
 

 You don’t have asthma if you don't wheeze.    

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Not everyone with asthma wheezes. Often, a cough is the only sign. If you find yourself coughing at night, when you exercise, or if your cough won’t go away, it may be asthma. Other common symptoms are chest tightness and trouble breathing.

 

If you have any of these symptoms, see your doctor. The sooner you begin treatment, the less damage to your lungs. A primary care doctor can usually diagnose and treat asthma. You may be sent to a specialist if you need extra tests, if you’ve had a life-threatening asthma attack, or if you need more help to keep your asthma under control.

 

 

People with asthma are more likely to be obese than those without it.

People with asthma are more likely to be obese than those without it.

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People with asthma are 12% more likely to be obese than those who don’t have it.

 

Why? Scientists aren’t sure. Trouble with breathing could cause people with asthma to be less physically active. But researchers are also looking at links between obesity and inflammation. Extra fat can lead to inflammation in the whole body, including possibly the lungs.

This is a common asthma attack trigger:

This is a common asthma attack trigger:

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When you catch a cold or flu, or get a sinus infection it irritates your airways and that can trigger asthma symptoms.  Acid reflux and allergies to certain drugs can also trigger an asthma attack. Learning your triggers and avoiding them as best as you can may help lower your chances of asthma problems.

To help avoid asthma flare-ups, you should:

To help avoid asthma flare-ups, you should:

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Flu and colds can make your asthma much worse. And having asthma means you have a bigger chance of having problems caused by the flu. So if you have asthma, get a flu shot every year and wash your hands often. Also, be extra careful around people who are sick.

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Your Score:     You correctly answered   out of   questions.

You can exhale! You aced this asthma quiz.

Breathe easy! You’re almost an asthma expert.

It’s time to brush up on your asthma facts. Your lungs will thank you.

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