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    Treating Asthma in Children

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    The Five Parts to an Asthma Treatment Plan

    Step 1 -- Identifying and Controlling Asthma Triggers

    Children with asthma have different sets of triggers. Triggers are the factors that irritate the airways and cause asthma symptoms. Triggers can change seasonally and as a child grows older. Some common triggers are cigarette smoke, allergens like dust, dust mites, and pet dander, viral infections, irritants like strong perfumes, exercise, breathing cold air, and weather changes.

    Identifying triggers and symptoms can take time. Keep a record of when symptoms occur and how long they last. Once patterns are discovered, some of the triggers can be avoided through environmental control measures, which are steps to reduce exposure to a child's allergy triggers. Talk with your doctor about starting with environmental control measures that will limit those allergens and irritants causing immediate problems for a child. Remember that allergies develop over time with continued exposure to allergens, so a child's asthma triggers may change over time.

    Others who provide care for your child, such as babysitters, day care providers, or teachers must be informed and knowledgeable regarding your child's asthma treatment plan. Many schools have initiated programs for their staff to be educated about asthma and recognize severe asthma symptoms.

    The following are suggested environmental control measures for different allergens and irritants:

    Indoor controls

    To control dust mites:

    • Use only polyester-filled pillows and comforters (never feather or down). Use mite-proof covers (available at allergy supply stores) over pillows and mattresses. Keep covers clean by vacuuming or wiping them down once a week.
    • Wash your child's sheets and blankets once a week in very hot water (130 degrees or higher) to kill dust mites.
    • Keep upholstered furniture, window mini-blinds, and carpeting out of a child's bedroom and playroom because they can collect dust and dust mites (especially carpets). Use washable throw rugs and curtains and wash them in hot water weekly. Vinyl window shades that can be wiped down can also be used.
    • Dust and vacuum weekly. If possible, use a vacuum specially designed to collect and trap dust mites (with a HEPA filter).
    • Reduce the number of dust-collecting house plants, books, knickknacks, and non washable stuffed animals in your home.
    • Avoid humidifiers when possible, because moist air promotes dust mite infestation and mold growth.
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