Reviewed by Andrew Seibert on December 06, 2011

Sources

Robin Hyman, RRT, AE-C, Pulmonary Education Specialist, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta—Scottish Rite campus

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Video Transcript

Robin hyman, RRT, AE-C, Pulmonary Education Specialist: How to use a nebulizer. We're going to set up the compressor nebulizer. You need an air compressor, many of them are electrically powered. There are a couple out on the market that are battery powered—they're very expensive. This is the on and off switch. When you turn this on, air is coming out. This is a filter. We ask the families to change the filters as often as the manufacturer recommends. There's tubing required for any nebulizer treatment. It doesn't matter which end attaches here. This is the functional piece—this is the nebulizer. The nebulizer has two pieces. This might look like a medicine vile—open it up and pour in the whole medicine the entire contents of the vile if that's what the doctor prescribes. Air plus medicine equals the treatment. It has to be held up and down because if you hold it sideways the medicine can spill out. If the child is six years old or older many of them may use the mouthpiece. And they inhale the medicine directly. For babies and toddlers and small children who can't use the mouthpiece because they don't understand to take a deep breath. For treatment of a young child, they might sit in a highchair, a sassy seat, they might sit in your lap. They might sit up in bed. And they breathe this mist and the medicine opens up their lungs.