Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Health & Pregnancy

Font Size

Choosing Child Care Service

Whether you are looking for a day care center or at-home care, choosing child care service requires doing your homework.

The Optimal Caregiver continued...

Greenspan says more parents should consider an approach that he describes in his book, The Four-Thirds Solution, in which parents arrange their work shifts and schedules to reduce or eliminate the need for outside child care service -- for example, each parent works two-thirds of a full-time week, and devotes the remaining time to their baby.

According to Schiller, the first six weeks of a baby's life are important times for one or both parents to assume the caretaking role. "The child is brand new to the world, and is just getting used to his or her environment at home," she says. "Also, anytime you put a child into group care, you run the risk of colds and other communicable illnesses, which you'd like to avoid in the earliest weeks of life."

The Search Goes On

If you're selecting a nanny or au pair to come into your home, make sure you check references carefully. Is this someone who has a proven record of responsibility and trustworthiness? Has she gotten high marks from other families she has worked for? How does she interact with your baby the first time or two that they meet?

When you're considering a child-care center or a family home that cares for children, talk to other parents who have sent their youngsters there and get a sense of whether they've been happy with the experience. No matter what venue you choose, however, many of the same selection criteria apply:

  • Visit the facility or home several times before making a decision.
  • Meet the director and caretakers, and visit the rooms or the nursery where your child will be spending time.
  • Look for warmth and responsiveness in caregivers.
  • Get a sense of whether caregivers talk and sing to babies, and have ongoing interactions with every child.
  • Are there plenty of play areas, and mobiles over each crib?
  • Is the environment rich with stimulation -- sounds and colors that increase a child's awareness of his or her world?
  • Is the facility clean? Does it have good sanitary procedures in the kitchen and diaper-changing areas?

Seek a staff-to-child ratio that allows each youngster to get plenty of attention. "In the case of infants, a ratio of two babies per caregiver is ideal," says Greenspan.

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, child-care centers should provide no less than one adult caregiver per three infants less than 24 months old. For older children, acceptable ratios are:

  • One adult per four children 25 to 30 months old
  • One adult per five children 31 to 35 months old
  • One adult per seven children at age 3 years old
  • One adult per eight children 4 to 5 years old

In addition to numbers, ask about the turnover of staff and look for consistency in personnel. "The caretaker should be a permanent fixture," says Schiller. "You don't want a caretaker who keeps the job for two weeks and quits, and then someone else comes in and doesn't stay long either."

Pregnancy Week-By-Week Newsletter

Delivered right to your inbox, get pictures and facts on
what to expect each week of your pregnancy.

Today on WebMD

Woman smiling as she reads pregnancy test
Slideshow
pregnant woman with salad
Quiz
 
pregnancy am i pregnant
Article
babyapp
NEW
 

slideshow fetal development
Slideshow
pregnancy first trimester warning signs
Article
 
What Causes Bipolar
Video
Woman trying on dress in store
Slideshow
 

pregnant woman
Article
Close up on eyes of baby breastfeeding
Video
 
healthtool pregnancy calendar
Tool
eddleman prepare your body pregnancy
Video