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Feeling Lightheaded

Some women get very lightheaded or dizzy during early pregnancy. Some even have fainting spells. It could be hormones, or it might low blood pressure, McLean says.

See your OB or midwife to get a better idea of what's going on. If your blood sugar is low, try eating smaller meals more often throughout the day.

For many women, the spacey feeling gets better after the first trimester, she says.

Nausea and Vomiting

Queasiness can start early on, although full-blown nausea and vomiting usually don't usually show up until 7 to 9 weeks, Conry says. Small, frequent, protein-rich meals can help control your uneasy stomach. Staying hydrated can, too.

To help fluids go down easily, McLean suggests adding cucumber slices or strawberries to water. Diluted fruit juice, ginger tea, or a basic pregnancy tea (they usually contain red raspberry leaf and nettles) are also good options. Mint tea can help with nausea, but she warns it can make heartburn, another common pregnancy symptom, worse.

A snack before bed, like a small piece of cheese and some nuts, can help steady your blood sugar overnight so you don't wake up feeling very sick.

Nausea usually disappears by 12 weeks, though some people find it lasts through 16 weeks, and it doesn't go away for others. Check in with your doctor or midwife if you're vomiting so much you're not keeping anything down or you're losing weight, McLean says. There are medications that help extreme morning sickness.

Disgusted by Specific Foods

Can't stand the smell -- much less the taste -- of certain foods? Some women find that one of their first signs of pregnancy is a heightened sense of smell. It makes scents they were OK with before absolutely sickening. Other women develop a funny taste in their mouth that they just can't get rid of, McLean says.

If whole groups of foods are literally off the table because they make you feel like you're going to heave, don't worry about the baby. "The baby is so good at absorbing nutrients from the mom at this stage. It's the mom that suffers, not the fetus," Conry says.

Take a prenatal vitamin to make sure you're getting nutrients and folic acid, which you need to prevent certain birth defects. Drink lots of liquids, too. As long as you avoid getting dehydrated, you should get through this phase just fine, she says. You'll likely lose your disgust as you head into your second trimester.

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