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How will your doctor care for you during your pregnancy? continued...

Tests for genetic or other problems also may be done, especially if you are 35 or older or if you had a genetic problem in a past pregnancy.

Your doctor will prescribe any medicine you may need, such as for diabetes, asthma, or high blood pressure.

Talk to your doctor about where he or she would like you to give birth. Your doctor may want you to have your baby in a hospital that offers special care for women and babies who may have problems.

If your doctor thinks that your health or your baby's health is at risk, you may need to have the baby early.

What type of doctor will you see for a high-risk pregnancy?

Some women will see a doctor who has extra training in high-risk pregnancies. These doctors are called maternal-fetal specialists, or perinatologists. You may see this doctor and your regular doctor. Or the specialist may be your doctor throughout your pregnancy.

What can you do to help have a healthy pregnancy?

You can help yourself and your baby be as healthy as possible:

  • Go to all your doctor visits so that you don't miss tests to catch any new problems.
  • Eat a healthy diet that includes protein, milk and milk products, fruits, and vegetables. Talk to your doctor about any changes you may need in your diet.
  • Take any medicines, iron, or vitamins that your doctor prescribes. Don't take any vitamins or medicines (including over-the-counter medicines) without talking to your doctor first.
  • Take folic acid daily. Folic acid is a B vitamin. Taking folic acid before and during early pregnancy reduces your chance of having a baby with a neural tube defect or other birth defects.
  • Follow your doctor's instructions for activity. Your doctor will let you know if you can work and exercise.
  • Do not smoke. If you need help quitting, talk to your doctor about stop-smoking programs and medicines. Avoid other people's tobacco smoke.
  • Do not drink alcohol.
  • Stay away from people who have colds and other infections.

Your doctor may ask you to keep track of how much your baby moves every day.

WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: July 23, 2012
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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