Skip to content

continued...

If you're concerned about chemicals but need to keep up your appearance for professional reasons, consider getting highlights or using a natural dye.

Heather Woolery-Lloyd, MD, voluntary assistant professor of dermatology at the University of Miami, says, "If you're just covering grays, dyes like henna are good for people who want to go the more natural route."

Skip keratin hair-straightening treatments during pregnancy. They contain harmful formaldehyde.

Pregnancy Hair Maintenance

You shouldn't need to change your shampoo, conditioner, hair spray, gel, mousse, or blow-dry and curling-iron routine while you're expecting, unless you use prescription dandruff shampoo. Talk to your doctor, because some medicated shampoos can't be used during pregnancy.

"Prescription antifungal shampoo is usually OK," Woolery-Lloyd says, "but prescription cortisone shampoo would have to be approved by your OB/GYN."

Some pregnant women can become overwhelmed by aromas, and many hair-care products are scented. If the smell of your shampoo or hair spray becomes too strong to tolerate, switch to a fragrance-free version.

Postpartum Hair Drama

Expect your streak of good-hair days to end a few months after your baby is born: All of the hair that stuck around for longer than usual will begin to fall out.

"Three to six months after having the baby, they will have a massive loss of hair," Woolery-Lloyd says. "It can be very dramatic and extremely traumatizing, or it can be mild."

Afterward, your hair will grow normally. Shedding while you're recovering from pregnancy is normal and healthy. It doesn't mean you're going bald.