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  • Question 1/10

    You can be in labor even if your water hasn't broken.

  • Answer 1/10

    You can be in labor even if your water hasn't broken.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Forget the movies. Many women don’t have a big gush before they go into labor. Some just have a trickle. Or a doctor breaks their water at the hospital.

     

    If yours breaks, head to the hospital and call your doctor. Tell her when it happened, how much there was, and what it looked like. It may mean labor is about to begin, but not always.

  • Question 1/10

    He's my first baby! How soon can I meet him?

  • Answer 1/10

    He's my first baby! How soon can I meet him?

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    • Correct Answer:

    That’s the average. If it’s not your first, things will likely move more quickly -- 8 to 10 hours on average. That said, every labor is different, and the timing can vary widely.

     

    Yours is fast if it takes less than 3 hours, from the beginning of regular contractions to birth. That’s rare! A small percentage of births happen that quickly.

  • Question 1/10

    I can only have ice chips once I’m in labor.

  • Answer 1/10

    I can only have ice chips once I’m in labor.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    You can have more than that. Most women can drink clear liquids, according to The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. You can rehydrate with drinks like water, juice, coffee, and sports drinks.

     

    Eating during labor is generally not OK, in case you suddenly need a C-section.

  • Answer 1/10

    When is it too late to get an epidural for pain relief?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    There’s no cutoff based on dilation or hours in labor, but it’s too late once your little one's head is crowning.

     

    You'll need to be able to hold still while the anesthesiologist does the procedure, which takes about 5 minutes. Once it’s over, you’ll start to feel relief within 10 to 20 minutes. So keep that delay in mind as you plan when you’ll ask for an epidural.

  • Question 1/10

    Contractions end once your baby’s born.

  • Answer 1/10

    Contractions end once your baby’s born.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    The highlight of labor is certainly over once you’ve delivered and met your baby. But there's still one more stage ahead of you. Usually between 5 and 30 minutes after giving birth, you’ll have contractions to deliver the placenta. One quick push and you’re done.

  • Question 1/10

    Sex, walking, and eating spicy foods will bring on labor.

  • Answer 1/10

    Sex, walking, and eating spicy foods will bring on labor.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    You’re so ready to have this baby! You’ve heard that chowing down on chilies, doing laps around the neighborhood, or hitting the bedroom are the kick-start you need. If those things make you feel better, fine, but there’s no research to show that they get labor going.

  • Answer 1/10

    You’re probably in labor if:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    A dilating cervix and feeling that your baby has dropped lower are signs that labor is close. But regular, strong contractions are the surest signal that your little one is on the way.

     

    Contractions could be 15 to 20 minutes apart at first. They’ll become longer, stronger, and come closer together.

     

    When you’re in your third trimester, talk with your doctor about when you should call her if you think you’re in labor.

  • Question 1/10

    You can be awake during a C-section.

  • Answer 1/10

    You can be awake during a C-section.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    If it’s planned, you won’t miss a moment when your baby arrives.

     

    Your doctor will probably give you an epidural or spinal block to numb you from the chest down. The whole process takes about 45 minutes to an hour. It won’t hurt, but you may feel some tugging or pushing.

     

    You’ll be able to see and hear the baby right after delivery, as long it goes according to plan. If you unexpectedly need a C-section, the situation may be different.

  • Question 1/10

    It’s false labor if your contractions:

  • Answer 1/10

    It’s false labor if your contractions:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    It’s normal to feel your uterus tighten occasionally (and even painfully) in the months before your due date. These "Braxton Hicks contractions" may come and go. And they don’t get closer together over time, unlike true contractions.

     

    False ones might also go away when you change positions, rest, or walk. When you’re in labor, the contractions won’t stop, no matter how you move. Not sure? Your doctor can check your cervix for signs it’s the real thing.

  • Answer 1/10

    It’s time to push when:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    During labor, your cervix will open (dilate) to 10 centimeters. Then it’s go time. There’s enough room for your little one to pass through. Your doctor or midwife will check your cervix and thebaby’s position, and tell you when it’s OK to push. 

     

    This stage can take minutes to hours. Your doctor may ask you to push strongly or gently at different times.

     

    Lying on your back isn’t the only option. You can squat, sit, or kneel if feels better.

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Sources | Reviewed by Nivin Todd, MD on March 18, 2016 Medically Reviewed on March 18, 2016

Reviewed by Nivin Todd, MD on
March 18, 2016

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

1) Getty Images

 

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: “After My Water Breaks, When Will Labor Begin?”

Cleveland Clinic: “Labor and Delivery.”

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: “How to Tell When Labor Begins.”

Journal of Midwifery and Women’s Health: “Am I in Labor?”

U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Office on Women’s Health: “Labor and Birth."

Mayo Clinic: “Signs of Labor: Know What to Expect.”

Mayo Clinic: “Stages of Labor: Baby, It's Time!”

Suzuki, S. Journal of Clinical Medicine Research, March 2015.

Cedars-Sinai: “Questions About Childbirth Pain.”

American Society of Anesthesiologists: “Misconceptions About Labor and Delivery.”

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: “Medications for Pain Relief During Labor and Delivery.”

Mayo Clinic: “Can I Request an Induction?”

News release, The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

News release, American Society of Anesthesiologists.

Cleveland Clinic: “Skin-to-Skin Contact for You and Baby.”

Mayo Clinic: “Stage 3: Delivery of the Placenta.”

Mayo Clinic: ”Postpartum Care: What to Expect After a Vaginal Delivery.”

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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