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Lumbar Spinal Stenosis - What Increases Your Risk

The risk of having lumbar spinal stenosis increases if you:

  • Are older than age 50.
  • Have a history of spinal injury.
  • Have arthritis of the spine, which can damage the joints.
  • Have a bone disease that may soften the spinal bones or cause calcium deposits to form. Examples include:
  • Are born with spondylolysis.
  • Have an abnormally narrow spinal canal, which may be inherited or may develop in curvature of the spine (scoliosis).
  • Have a genetic (inherited) disorder in which the bones of the arms and legs don't grow to normal size and the vertebrae of the spine don't grow normally (achondroplastic dwarfism).
  • Have had lower back surgery, which may cause scarring that puts pressure on the spinal nerves. Progressive spinal stenosis may occur, even after successful back surgery.
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WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: March 12, 2014
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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