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    9 Steps to End Chronic Worrying

    Experts explain how to reduce excessive worrying that can have mental and physical effects.
    By
    WebMD Feature
    Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

    Are you a worry wart? A nervous Nellie? Do you constantly fret about everything and anything from your health to how you are perceived at work to whether or not a terror strike is imminent?

    If this sounds like you, then you may be worrying your life away. This excessive worry doesn't just affect your mental health; it also can wreak havoc on your physical well-being. That's why WebMD spoke with experts about the reasons some of us worry excessively -- and ways to break this cycle and regain your life.

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    (Do you worry too much? What is the silliest thing you've ever worried about? Share with us on the Health Cafe message board.)

    Who Are the Worriers?

    Why are some people so prone to "what if disease," while others merely worry about something when it happens?

    There are several reasons, explains Robert L. Leahy, PhD, the author of The Worry Cure: 7 Steps to Stop Worry From Stopping You and the director of the American Institute for Cognitive Therapy in New York City.

    "There is a genetic component," he says. "There are also nurture or non-nurture factors."

    For example, people who come from divorced homes are 70% more likely to have generalized anxiety disorder -- characterized by chronic anxiety, exaggerated worry, and tension.

    Overprotective parents tend to raise worriers as well, he says. "Reverse parenting may also play a role." This occurs when the child is taking care of the parents because they are not functioning well.

    "There is probably is a biological component to chronic worry, but there is also an early environment component," agrees Sandy Taub, PsyD, a psychologist and psychoanalyst in private practice in Wilmington, Del. "The feeling of safety that 'my mother will keep me safe' should be internalized and grow along with you so that, for the most part, you feel secure," she explains.

    "But if you had a mom who was not as available and not consistent, you can develop the mind-set that the world is not such a safe place." Divorce and overprotection can also gnaw away at a person's feelings of internal safety and security.

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