Skip to content

    Health & Balance

    Font Size
    A
    A
    A

    Relax in a Hurry

    Tension can build during your busy day, but, believe it or not, you do have time to relieve that stress.
    By
    WebMD Feature
    Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

    The phones, the caffeine, the boss, dinging faxes, deadlines, doubling up for laid-off colleagues, fear of being laid-off yourself -- eeek, pretty soon your body is a clenched fist and you haven't stood up from the desk in hours!

    You need to relax. But who can remember to -- and who has time? You do! It only takes five minutes.

    Recommended Related to Mind, Body, Spirit

    Recharge for the New Year

    By Erinn Bucklan After all the buildup and pressure leading up to the holidays, who doesn’t feel like they need a break during the last week of the year? “This time of year is stressful because of the combination of heightened activity level and heightened expectations,” says James Campbell Quick, professor of leadership and organizational behavior at the University of Texas at Arlington. “For those who have not made time for peace in their lives, this can be a really challenging season.” Use the...

    Read the Recharge for the New Year article > >

    A Quick Mental Fix

    If you are constantly stressed, according to Nick Hall, PhD, director of the Wellness Center at the Saddlebrook Resort in Wesley Chapel, Fla., you need to do as many things as possible to address both the effects and the causes.

    Herbert Benson, MD, an associate professor at Harvard Medical School and president of the Mind-Body Medical Institute in Boston, says the opposite of the stress response is the relaxation response. He suggests a quick mantra meditation when you feel yourself breathing shallowly and tensing up.

    "There are two things to remember about this," he says. "First, repetition is the key, and second, when you feel other thoughts coming -- and they will -- you must let them pass by and not address them."

    Here's what you do: At your desk, close your eyes, consciously relax your muscles, breathe in slowly and on the exhalation, say a meaningful word. For some, Benson says, this word may be "Love." For a Catholic, it could be "Hail Mary, filled with grace." For a Jew, "Shalom." For a Buddhist or Hindu, "Ohm." It's up to you.

    Breathe in, say the word silently while breathing out. When thoughts come, let them drift past. Do this for three or four minutes, open your eyes, and get back to work. Benson recommends doing this each morning before breakfast, too, for more than 10 minutes, but less than 20 minutes. This will set the practice in your mind, so when you need it at work, it will produce relief almost immediately.

    Exercise Remedies

    Hall has another way of causing the body to unclench itself. And that's by making it even more stressed! Run up a flight of stairs, he says. Put demands on your body -- this will trigger the same pathways in the brain and nervous system as stress does and fool the body into thinking it needs to go into recovery. Hall even suggests dropping down in your cubicle and ripping off 10 pushups.

    The Johns Hopkins cardiology department also recommends full-body relaxation by muscle group. Tense your facial muscles for five seconds, then relax. Then neck and shoulders. Work your way down. Shaking your arms and legs like a wet dog is also recommended.

    1 | 2 | 3

    Today on WebMD

    woman in yoga class
    6 health benefits of yoga.
    beautiful girl lying down of grass
    10 relaxation techniques to try.
     
    mature woman with glass of water
    Do you really need to drink 8 glasses of water a day?
    coffee beans in shape of mug
    Get the facts.
     
    Take your medication
    Slideshow
    Hand appearing to hold the sun
    Article
     
    Hungover man
    Slideshow
    Welcome mat and wellington boots
    Slideshow
     
    Woman worn out on couch
    Article
    Happy and sad faces
    Quiz
     
    Fingertip with string tied in a bow
    Article
    laughing family
    Quiz