Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Health & Balance

Font Size
A
A
A

Signs of Sudden Wealth Syndrome


WebMD Feature

April 17, 2000 (Kentfield, Calif.) -- For all our fantasies of winning the lottery, sudden fortune can cause remarkable stress.

Therapist Stephen Goldbart, PhD, of Kentfield, Calif., says the newly rich "feel cut off from their friends and family. They're suspicious of investment counselors, afraid their kids will grow up spoiled or crippled by the money. And they suffer from an identity crisis because at the ripe old age of thirty-something they no longer have to go to work."

Recommended Related to Mind, Body, Spirit

Managing Stress Naturally

By Kathryn Drury Feeling tense? Let these natural techniques help you relax and rejuvenate.   If you've been feeling more stress than usual, there are natural techniques that can help you restore your calm. Your lifestyle can be modified to help you stay calm. If you're feeling a little anxious, try the following: Avoid stimulants such as caffeine, and herbs including guarana, Chinese ephedra, and ma huang, all of which are sometimes sold as "tonics" or "energizers." They force...

Read the Managing Stress Naturally article > >

Goldbart and his partner Joan Di Furia, MFT, offer this advice for recognizing when money is getting you into trouble:

  • You feel uncomfortably different from your friends and you're afraid to tell them how you feel about your new status.
  • Being wealthy makes for more guilt than pleasure.
  • Instead of feeling powerful and decisive, you feel paralyzed and unable to decide how to spend your money.
  • You can't stand the envy of friends and acquaintances -- you find yourself becoming more isolated.
  • You feel like you don't quite deserve the money and you can't believe it's really yours.
  • You suffer from "ticker shock" and become obsessed with watching the stock market.
  • You're afraid that you'll lose your money and your good fortune will simply vanish overnight.

    (Compiled by Kentfield, Calif., therapists Stephen Goldbart, PhD, and Joan Di Furia, MFT, owners of the Money, Meaning, and Choices Institute).

Valerie Andrews has written for Intuition, HealthScout, and many other publications. She lives in Greenbrae, Calif.

Today on WebMD

Hands breaking pencil in frustration
Quiz
Dark chocolate bars
Slideshow
 
puppy eating
Slideshow
concentration killers
Slideshow
 
man reading sticky notes
Quiz
worried kid
fitArticle
 
Hungover man
Slideshow
Woman opening window
Slideshow
 
Woman yawning
Health Check
Happy and sad faces
Quiz
 
brain food
Slideshow
laughing family
Quiz