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The WebMD Healthy You Challenge: Two Mom Makeovers

WebMD's expert team helps two crazy-busy mothers transform their eating, workout, and life routines.
By
WebMD Magazine - Feature

Balance. Time. Exercise. We could all use a little more of each. Impossible, right? Not at all. As WebMD's team of experts proves, it can be done.

Two busy moms looking for tips about how to eat more healthfully, work fitness into their hectic schedules, and better manage their lives so they have time for their kids, husband, house, career -- and themselves -- shared their stories and struggles with our expert trio: a nutritionist, a fitness trainer, and a life coach. The experts gave them simple, real-world advice they can put into action right away -- advice that can also work for you.

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For our team of experts we chose:

The trainer

Michael Lin, certified personal trainer and co-owner of Verve Health & Fitness in Washington, D.C.

The nutritionist

Carolyn O'Neil, MS, RD, registered dietitian in Atlanta, and co-author of The Dish on Eating Healthy and Being Fabulous!

The life coach

Tevis Rose Trower, founder of Balance Integration Corp. in New York City, certified creativity coach, and author of the "Life Works" blog at WebMD.

Four Kids and a Sweet Tooth

Heidi Swanson, 37, Minneapolis, Minn., stay-at-home mother of four boys ranging in age from 2 to 12. Heidi is 5 feet 7 inches and weighs 164 pounds.

I've been a full-time stay-at-home mom for two years and need help prioritizing my time. I get so busy that I lose focus. I can't remember the last time my husband and I had a date that wasn't work-related. And I have a terrible time getting to the gym enough to stay healthy.

My biggest problem with my diet is that I love to bake for my kids -- and I love to eat what I bake. I also seem to have this idea in my head that I need to clean my kids' plates when they don't. I do sit down for all of my meals, but at lunch, for example, I eat what I make for the kids, like mac and cheese and hot dogs -- although there is always a fruit and a veggie with this meal, and with dinner, too. I would love to know portion control for someone who's 37. I think I'm not supposed to be eating like I did before, because my metabolism's changing -- and I don't know what that looks like. I just eat until I'm full.

Exercising is tough. I want to work out four times a week, but I usually end up going to the gym just four times a month. Things just keep popping up. If we're out of groceries, for example, I have to go to the grocery store instead of working out. I can go to the gym when the kids are home because there's free child care there, but sometimes just the sheer responsibility of loading four people in the car to go with me is daunting. And sometimes I just feel too tired to work out.

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