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    Hate Overhearing Cell Phone Calls? This May Be Why

    Study found working people were more distracted by one-sided versus two-sided conversations

    WebMD News from HealthDay

    By Alan Mozes

    HealthDay Reporter

    WEDNESDAY, March 13 (HealthDay News) -- Adding to the list of "really annoying things," new research is pointing the finger at a technology that can turn public spaces into private misery for many: cellphones.

    The study suggests that cellphone calls, and the half-conversations listeners are forced to overhear, are a much more distracting form of background noise than an in-person exchange between two people.

    "I find cell phones annoying, frankly, and there's lots of research suggesting that many people agree -- so I wanted to study this," said study lead author Veronica Galvan, an assistant professor in the department of psychological sciences with the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of San Diego.

    "What we found," Galvan said, "was that there does seem to be something unique about a one-sided cell conversation that makes it more distracting for people to overhear than a two-way conversation."

    Galvan and her colleagues published their findings in the March 13 issue of the journal PLoS ONE.

    According to the authors, in 2012 wireless device users worldwide devoted more than 2.3 trillion minutes to cellphone calls, texting, listening to music and Web surfing. Many of the calls are being placed in public spaces such as restaurants, elevators or on public transport.

    Last year, a study conducted by researchers at Cornell University asked college students to try to ignore sound recordings while trying to complete a task. Their conclusion: Recordings of one-sided cell phone conversations were actually more distracting, irritating and taxing to the brain than two-sided in-person conversations.

    The newer study builds on that work, using a real-world study design. This time, Galvan's team had nearly 150 undergraduate students complete a word-play reading exercise.

    There was a hitch, though: Participants were exposed to one of two types of live conversations, either an in-person exchange between two people or a one-sided cellphone call.

    In both cases, the exchange was scripted to focus on the same range of topics, including shopping for furniture, details concerning a birthday party for Dad, or meeting up with a date in a shopping mall.

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